See also: locò

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈləʊ.kəʊ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊkəʊ

Etymology 1 edit

From Italian.

Adverb edit

loco (not comparable)

  1. (music) A direction in written or printed music to be returning to the proper pitch after having played an octave higher or lower.

Etymology 2 edit

From Spanish loco (insane, crazy; loose).

Adjective edit

loco (comparative more loco, superlative most loco)

  1. (colloquial) Crazy.
    • 1943 April 3, Super-Rabbit, spoken by an unnamed rabbit:
      It's Cottontail Smith, and he's gone plumb loco!
    • 1988, Phil Collins (lyrics and music), “Loco in Acapulco”, in Indestructible, performed by Four Tops:
      Going loco down in Acapulco / If you stay too long / Yes, you'll be going loco down in Acapulco / The magic down there is so strong
    • 1993, “Insane in the Brain”, in Black Sunday, performed by Cypress Hill:
      Who you trying to get crazy with ése? Don't you know I'm loco?
    • 2003, “In da Club”, in Get Rich or Die Tryin', performed by 50 Cent:
      Holla in New York, fo'sho they'll tell you I'm loco
    • 2003 December 15, The New Yorker, page 56:
      You know, I’m a little loco. Kinda crazy, zany guy.
  2. (Southwestern US) Intoxicated by eating locoweed.
    Synonym: pea struck
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

loco (plural locos or locoes)

  1. A certain species of Astragalus or Oxytropis, capable of causing locoism.
    Synonym: locoweed

Verb edit

loco (third-person singular simple present locos, present participle locoing, simple past and past participle locoed)

  1. (transitive) To poison with the loco plant; to affect with locoism.
  2. (transitive, colloquial, by extension) To render insane.
    • 1904, Charles Dudley Warner, “The Locoed Novelist”, in The Complete Essays of C. D. Warner[1]:
      They say that he is locoed. The insane asylums of California contain many shepherds.

Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Clipping of locomotive.

Noun edit

loco (plural locos)

  1. (rail transport, informal) A locomotive.
    • 1898, Rudyard Kipling, “.007”, in The Day's Work[2], New York: Doubleday & McClure Co., page 243:
      A locomotive is, next to a marine engine, the most sensitive thing man ever made; and No. .007, besides being sensitive, was new. The red paint was hardly dry on his spotless bumper-bar, his headlight shone like a fireman’s helmet, and his cab might have been a hard-wood-finish parlour. They had run him into the round-house after his trial—he had said good-bye to his best friend in the shops, the overhead travelling-crane—the big world was just outside; and the other locos were taking stock of him.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of locomotive

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

loco f (plural locos)

  1. (informal) locomotive

Further reading edit

Interlingua edit

Noun edit

loco (plural locos)

  1. place, location

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɔ.ko/
  • Rhymes: -ɔko
  • Hyphenation: lò‧co

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin locus, from Old Latin stlocus, from Proto-Indo-European *stel- (to put, place, locate).

Noun edit

loco m (plural lochi or (obsolete, regional) locora f)

  1. (archaic, now poetic) Alternative form of luogo (place, location)
    • mid 1300smid 1310s, Dante Alighieri, “Canto III”, in Inferno [Hell]‎[3], lines 16–18; republished as Giorgio Petrocchi, editor, La Commedia secondo l'antica vulgata [The Commedia according to the ancient vulgate]‎[4], 2nd revised edition, Florence: publ. Le Lettere, 1994:
      ["]Noi siam venuti al loco ov’i’ t’ ho detto / che tu vedrai le genti dolorose / c’ hanno perduto il ben de l’intelletto".
      "We have come to the place wherein I told you that you will see the tormented people who have lost the good of intellect."
    • 1350s, anonymous author, “Prologo e primo capitolo [Preface and first chapter]”, in Cronica [Chronicle]‎[5] (overall work in Old Italian); republished as Giuseppe Porta, editor, Anonimo romano - Cronica, Adelphi, 1979, →ISBN:
      le memorie se facevano con scoiture in sassi e pataffii, li quali se ponevano nelle locora famose dove demoravano moititudine de iente (Rome)
      accounts were made through incisions on rocks and gravestones, which were placed in famed places, where moltitudes of people lived

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Latin illōc but influenced in its form by Etymology 1.

Adverb edit

loco

  1. (Old Italian, now only dialectal) there, in that place
    Synonyms: (uncommon) colà, (literary) ivi, ,
    • c. 1260s, Brunetto Latini, chapter VII, in Il tesoretto [The small treasure]‎[6], lines 769–774; collected in Luigi Di Benedetto, editor, Poemetti allegorico-didattici del secolo XIII [Allegorical-didactical poems from the 13th century]‎[7], Bari: Laterza, 1941, page 25:
      Questi hanno per ofizio
      che lo bene, e lo vizio,
      li fatti, e le favelle
      ritornano ale celle
      ch’i’ v’agio nominate,
      e loco son pensate.
      Their [the senses'] task is [to see to it] that the good, and the vices, the facts, and the words return to the spaces I have mentioned, and there they're thought.

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

loco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of locare

Further reading edit

  • loco1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *stlokāō. Equivalent to locus (place, location).[1]

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

locō (present infinitive locāre, perfect active locāvī, supine locātum); first conjugation

  1. to put, place, set
    Synonyms: pono, colloco, figo, sisto, statuo, constituo, struō, impono, defigo
  2. to arrange, establish
  3. to lease, hire out, lend

Conjugation edit

   Conjugation of locō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present locō locās locat locāmus locātis locant
imperfect locābam locābās locābat locābāmus locābātis locābant
future locābō locābis locābit locābimus locābitis locābunt
perfect locāvī locāvistī,
locāstī2
locāvit,
locāt2
locāvimus,
locāmus2
locāvistis,
locāstis2
locāvērunt,
locāvēre,
locārunt2
pluperfect locāveram,
locāram2
locāverās,
locārās2
locāverat,
locārat2
locāverāmus,
locārāmus2
locāverātis,
locārātis2
locāverant,
locārant2
future perfect locāverō,
locārō2
locāveris,
locāris2
locāverit,
locārit2
locāverimus,
locārimus2
locāveritis,
locāritis2
locāverint,
locārint2
sigmatic future1 locāssō locāssis locāssit locāssimus locāssitis locāssint
passive present locor locāris,
locāre
locātur locāmur locāminī locantur
imperfect locābar locābāris,
locābāre
locābātur locābāmur locābāminī locābantur
future locābor locāberis,
locābere
locābitur locābimur locābiminī locābuntur
perfect locātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect locātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect locātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present locem locēs locet locēmus locētis locent
imperfect locārem locārēs locāret locārēmus locārētis locārent
perfect locāverim,
locārim2
locāverīs,
locārīs2
locāverit,
locārit2
locāverīmus,
locārīmus2
locāverītis,
locārītis2
locāverint,
locārint2
pluperfect locāvissem,
locāssem2
locāvissēs,
locāssēs2
locāvisset,
locāsset2
locāvissēmus,
locāssēmus2
locāvissētis,
locāssētis2
locāvissent,
locāssent2
sigmatic aorist1 locāssim locāssīs locāssīt locāssīmus locāssītis locāssint
passive present locer locēris,
locēre
locētur locēmur locēminī locentur
imperfect locārer locārēris,
locārēre
locārētur locārēmur locārēminī locārentur
perfect locātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect locātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present locā locāte
future locātō locātō locātōte locantō
passive present locāre locāminī
future locātor locātor locantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives locāre locāvisse,
locāsse2
locātūrum esse locārī locātum esse locātum īrī
participles locāns locātūrus locātus locandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
locandī locandō locandum locandō locātum locātū

1At least one use of the archaic "sigmatic future" and "sigmatic aorist" tenses is attested, which are used by Old Latin writers; most notably Plautus and Terence. The sigmatic future is generally ascribed a future or future perfect meaning, while the sigmatic aorist expresses a possible desire ("might want to").
2At least one rare poetic syncopated perfect form is attested.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Catalan: llogar
  • German: lozieren
  • English: locate
  • French: louer
  • Friulian: logâ
  • Italian: locare
  • Occitan: logar
  • Sicilian: lucari
  • Spanish: logar
  • Venetian: logar
  • Welsh: llogi

Noun edit

locō m

  1. dative/ablative singular of locus (place, spot)

References edit

  • loco”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • loco”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • loco in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[8], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) heights, high ground: loca edita, superiora
    • (ambiguous) rough and hilly ground: loca aspera et montuosa (Planc. 9. 22)
    • (ambiguous) level country; plains: loca plana or simply plana
    • (ambiguous) uncultivated districts: loca inculta
    • (ambiguous) deserts: loca deserta (opp. frequentia)
    • (ambiguous) pleasant districts; charming surroundings: loca amoena, amoenitas locorum
    • (ambiguous) to be favourably situated: opportuno loco situm or positum esse
    • (ambiguous) distant places: loca longinqua
    • (ambiguous) to leave a place: discedere a, de, ex loco aliquo
    • (ambiguous) to leave a place: egredi loco; excedere ex loco
    • (ambiguous) to quit a place for ever: decedere loco, de, ex loco
    • (ambiguous) not to stir from one's place: loco or vestigio se non movere
    • (ambiguous) to treat as one's own child: aliquem in liberorum loco habere
    • (ambiguous) my position is considerably improved; my prospects are brighter: res meae meliore loco, in meliore causa sunt
    • (ambiguous) how are you getting on: quo loco res tuae sunt?
    • (ambiguous) at this point the question arises: hoc loco exsistit quaestio, quaeritur
    • (ambiguous) our (not noster) author tells us at this point: scriptor hoc loco dicit
    • (ambiguous) Cicero says this somewhere: Cicero loco quodam haec dicit
    • (ambiguous) to set an ambuscade: insidias collocare, locare (Mil. 10. 27)
    • (ambiguous) to place some one in ambush: aliquem in insidiis locare, collocare, ponere
    • (ambiguous) to dwell in a certain place: domicilium (sedem ac domicilium) habere in aliquo loco
    • (ambiguous) to contract for the building of something: opus locare
    • (ambiguous) to give, undertake a contract for building a house: domum aedificandam locare, conducere
    • (ambiguous) of high rank: summo loco natus
    • (ambiguous) of illustrious family: nobili, honesto, illustri loco or genere natus
    • (ambiguous) of humble, obscure origin: humili, obscuro loco natus
    • (ambiguous) from the lowest classes: infimo loco natus
    • (ambiguous) a knight by birth: equestri loco natus or ortus
    • (ambiguous) to occupy a very high position in the state: in altissimo dignitatis gradu collocatum, locatum, positum esse
    • (ambiguous) to receive tenders for the construction of temples, highroads: locare aedes, vias faciendas (Phil. 9. 7. 16)
    • (ambiguous) to let out public works to contract: locare opera publica
    • (ambiguous) to reconnoitre the ground: loca, regiones, loci naturam explorare
    • (ambiguous) to occupy the high ground: occupare loca superiora
    • (ambiguous) to encamp: castra ponere, locare
    • (ambiguous) in a favourable position: idoneo, aequo, suo (opp. iniquo) loco
    • (ambiguous) to drive the enemy from his position: loco movere, depellere, deicere hostem (B. G. 7. 51)
    • (ambiguous) to abandon one's position: loco excedere
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 347

Old Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Perhaps borrowed from Andalusian Arabic لَوْقَاء (láwqa), from Arabic لَوْقَاء (lawqāʔ, stupid), or from Ancient Greek γλαυκός (glaukós, clear). For more, see the modern Spanish descendant.

Adjective edit

loco (feminine loca, masculine plural locos, feminine plural locas)

  1. crazy, mad, insane
    • c. 1280, Alfonso X, General Estoria, tercera parte, (published by Pedro Sánchez-Prieto Borja and Bautista Horcajada Diezma, 1994, Madrid: Gredos):
      Yo só muy loco entre los omnes, e la sapiencia d'ellos non es comigo, mas la de Dios; ca la que yo é non me la dieron ellos si non Dios.
      I am insane among people, and their wisdom is not with me, but rather God's, for mine was not given to me by them but by God.

Descendants edit

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

loco

  1. first-person singular present indicative of locar

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈloko/ [ˈlo.ko]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -oko
  • Syllabification: lo‧co

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Spanish loco, perhaps from Andalusian Arabic لَوْقَاء (láwqa), from Arabic لَوْقَاء (lawqāʔ), feminine singular form of أَلْوَق (ʔalwaq, stupid),[1] by reinterpreting the final Andalusian Arabic -a as the Ibero-Romance -a and back-forming the masculine with -o. Edward Roberts thinks the term is related to Arabic لَاق (lāq, to soften),[2] but this verb is of root l-y-q, not l-w-q like أَلْوَق (ʔalwaq). Alternatively, derived from Ancient Greek γλαυκός (glaukós, clear). Compare Portuguese louco and Sicilian loccu.

Adjective edit

loco (feminine loca, masculine plural locos, feminine plural locas, superlative loquísimo)

  1. crazy, insane, mad, nuts (asserting that something is out of place in the head)
    Synonyms: chiflado, desquiciado, pirado, trastornado
    Estoy loco por ti.I am crazy for you, madly in love with you.
    David está muy loco.David's really crazy.
    Lorena se pone algo loca cuando bebe.Lorena gets a bit crazy when she drinks [alcohol].
  2. rash, risky, imprudent
    Synonyms: alocado, arrebatado, atolondrado, imprudente, insensato
    una decisión loca de último momentoa rash decision taken at the last minute
    No sean locos, tómense su tiempo.Don't be imprudent, take your time.
  3. tremendous, terrific, huge, enormous
    Synonyms: enorme, grande, tremendo
    Tuviste una suerte loca al ganar la rifa.You had some huge luck when winning the raffle.
  4. malfunctioning, broken and working incorrectly (said of a machine)
    El reloj de la abuela se ha vuelto loco.Grandma's clock has started malfunctioning.
  5. overgrown, rambling
    Synonym: descuidado
    Los arbustos se ven locos, deberías podarlos.The bushes look overgrown now, you should trim them.
    El cabello se te ve loco, ve a cortártelo.Your hair looks overgrown, go get a haircut.
  6. loose (pipe fittings, pulley)
    Synonyms: flojo, suelto
  7. (colloquial) sexy (only with ser)
    Pero qué loca es, qué loca se ve.She's so sexy, she looks so sexy.
Descendants edit
  • English: loco
  • Swedish: loco
  • Tetelcingo Nahuatl: luco

Noun edit

loco m (plural locos, feminine loca, feminine plural locas)

  1. (derogatory) a crazy person; a madman
    Ese es un loco; ten cuidado.He is a crazy man, be careful.
  2. a highly affected homosexual; fruit
  3. a plant in the genus Astragalus or Oxytropis
Derived terms edit

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ Joan Coromines, José A. Pascual (1984) “loco”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), volumes III (G–Ma), Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN, page 683
  2. ^ Roberts, Edward A. (2014) A Comprehensive Etymological Dictionary of the Spanish Language with Families of Words based on Indo-European Roots, Xlibris Corporation, →ISBN

Etymology 2 edit

From Mapudungun [Term?].

Noun edit

loco m (plural locos)

  1. (Chile) Chilean edible gastropod mollusk that resembles abalone but is, in fact, a muricid (Concholepas concholepas)
    Synonym: abalón chileno

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish loco.

Adjective edit

loco (comparative mer loco, superlative mest loco)

  1. (slang) crazy, nuts

References edit