See also: Momo, mómo, mòmò, and момо

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Tibetan མོག་མོག (mog mog), from Mandarin 饃饃馍馍 (mómo).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

momo (plural momos)

  1. A type of Tibetan, Ladakhi and Nepali dumpling made with a simple flour and water dough.
    • 2007 July 1, “Far East of the U.N.”, in New York Times[1]:
      Many dishes show a direct influence of China or India; for example, momos, or Tibetan dumplings, look like Chinese pot-stickers.

TranslationsEdit


AdangmeEdit

AdverbEdit

momo

  1. already

AiwooEdit

VerbEdit

momo

  1. to chew (in order to swallow)

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit


HopiEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

momo (plural momòot)

  1. bee

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

momo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of もも

KholosiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit माम (māma, uncle).

NounEdit

momo m

  1. (family) maternal uncle

ReferencesEdit

  • Eric Anonby; Hassan Mohebi Bahmani (2014), “Shipwrecked and Landlocked: Kholosi, an Indo-Aryan Language in South-west Iran”, in Cahier de Studia Iranica xx[2], pages 13-36

MaoriEdit

NounEdit

momo

  1. a type, a kind, a species, a breed, a variety, a race, a genre

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

momo m (plural momos)

  1. King Momo (character representing the king of carnival in Latin America)
  2. momo

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain:

Cognate to Portuguese momo, Aragonese momo, Catalan mom, French momon (mask).

NounEdit

momo m (plural momos)

  1. funny face; silly face

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Mandarin (, “demon”).

NounEdit

momo

  1. monster, ghost