EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
A bee

From Middle English bee, from Old English bēo, from Proto-Germanic *bijō, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰey-.

NounEdit

bee (plural bees or (dialectal) been)

  1. A flying insect, of the clade Anthophila within the hymenopteran superfamily Apoidea, known for its organised societies (though only a minority have them), for collecting pollen and (in some species) producing wax and honey.
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Courte:
      His face was belymmed as byes had him stounge [].
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.12:
      An angry Wasp th'one in a viall had, / Th'other in hers an hony-laden Bee.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 12, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      Can there be a more formall, and better ordered policie, divided into so severall charges and offices, more constantly entertained, and better maintained, than that of Bees?
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene i], page 17:
      Ariell:
      Where the Bee ſucks, there ſuck I,
      In a Cowslips bell, I lie,
      There I cowch when Owles doe crie,
      On the Batts backe I doe flie
        after Sommer merrily.
      Merrily, merrily, ſhall I liue now
      Vnder the bloſſom that hangs on the Bow.
    • 2012, ‘Subtle poison’, The Economist, 31 March:
      Bees pollinate many of the world’s crops—a service estimated to be worth $15 billion a year in America alone.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
terms derived from bee (noun)
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from dialectal bene, been, bean (help given by neighbours), from Middle English been, bene (neighbourly help, prayer, petition, request, extra service given by a tenant to his lord),[1][2] from Old English bēn (prayer, request, petition, favour, compulsory service) from Proto-Germanic *bōniz (prayer, request, supplication). Cognate with Danish bøn (prayer), Dutch ban (curse), German Bann (ban). More at ban.

NounEdit

bee (plural bees)

  1. A contest, especially for spelling; see spelling bee.
    geography bee
  2. A community gathering to share labour, e.g. a sewing bee or a quilting bee.
    • S. G. Goodrich
      The cellar [] was dug by a bee in a single day.
    • 1973, Alan Skeoch, Tony H. Smith, Canadians and their society (page 139)
      There was but little variation in types of buildings in the pioneer period: house, church, store, barn and mill were usually much alike except in size, and a raising bee was the ordinary means of their erection.
    • 2011, Tim Blanning, "The reinvention of the night", Times Literary Supplement, 21 Sep 2011:
      Particularly resistant, for example, in many parts of northern Europe was the “spinning bee”, a nocturnal gathering of women to exchange gossip, stories, refreshment and – crucially – light and heat, as they spun wool or flax, knitted or sewed.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English beeȝ, bie, bei, begh, beiȝe, bege, beah, bye, from Old English bēah, bēag, from Proto-Germanic *baugaz.

NounEdit

bee (plural bees)

  1. (obsolete) A ring or torque; a bracelet.
    • 1658, Sir Thomas Browne, Urne-Burial, Penguin 2005, page 16:
      ...restoring unto the world much gold richly adorning his Sword, two hundred Rubies, many hundred Imperial Coynes, three hundred golden Bees, the bones and horseshoe of his horse enterred with him...

Etymology 4Edit

Variant spellings.

VerbEdit

bee

  1. Obsolete spelling of be
    • 1604 Reverend Cawdrey Table Aleph
      held that a ‘Nicholaitan is an heretike, like Nicholas, who held that wiues should bee common to all alike.’
  2. (obsolete) past participle of be; been
    Cride out, Now now Sir knight, shew what ye bee,

Etymology 5Edit

From Middle English [Term?], from Old English be, from Latin be (the name of the letter B).

NounEdit

bee (plural bees)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter B.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 6Edit

Probably from Old English bēah (ring). Compare bow.

NounEdit

bee (plural bees)

  1. (nautical, usually in the plural) Any of the pieces of hard wood bolted to the sides of the bowsprit, to reeve the fore-topmast stays through.
SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “Archived copy”, in (please provide the title of the work)[1], accessed 4 March 2012, archived from the original on 16 June 2012
  2. ^ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bee%5B3%5D

AnagramsEdit


AfarEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeː/
  • Hyphenation: bee

VerbEdit

bée

  1. (transitive) to take
  2. (transitive) to take away
  3. (transitive, + l-case) to overcome
  4. (transitive, + l-case) to be angry with

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of bee (type II verb)
Indicative
Perfective Imperfective
Positive Negative Positive Negative
1st singular bée mabenniyó beyá mabeyá
2nd singular beyté mabennitó beytá mabeytá
3rd singular m bée mabenná beyá mabeyá
3rd singular f beyté mabenná beytá mabeytá
1st plural beyné mabenninó beyná mabeyná
2nd plural beyteení mabennitonú beytaaná mabeytaaná
3rd plural beení mabennonú beyaaná mabeyaaná
Imperative Optative
Positive Negative Positive Negative
singular bey mabén beyáy bée way
plural beyá mabená beyóonay bée wóonay
Obligative Conjunctive
Positive Negative Positive Negative
1st singular beyaamá bée waamá bée bée wáyu
2nd singular beytaamá bée waytaamá beytu bée wáytu
3rd singular m beyaamá bée waamá bée bée wáyu
3rd singular f beytaamá bée waytaamá beytu bée wáytu
1st plural beynaamá bée waynaamá beynu bée wáynu
2nd plural beytaanamá bée waytaanamá beytánu bée waytóonu
3rd plural beyaanamá bée waanaamá beyánu bée wóonu
Consultative Positive converb
Positive Negative -h beyah
singular beyóo mabeyóo -k beyak
plural beynóo mabeynóo -ín(n)uh bénnuh
Future prospective -ínnuk bénnuk
Positive Negative Negative converb
1st singular beeliyó bée waamá -h bée waah
2nd singular beelitó bée waytaamá -k bée waak
3rd singular m beelé bée waamá -ín(n)uh bée wánnuh
3rd singular f beelé bée waytaamá -ínnuk bée wánnuk
1st plural beelinó bée waynaamá
2nd plural beelitónu bée waytaanamá
3rd plural beelónu bée waanaamá
Compound tenses
Past perfect perfective + -h + imperfective of en
Present progressive imperfective + -h + imperfective of en
Past progressive -k converb + perfective of sugé
Future progressive -k converb + imperfective of sugé
Past anterior imperfective + -h + perfective of en
imperfective + -h + perfective of sugé
Future anterior perfective + -h + imperfective of sugé
imperfective + -h + future simple of sugé
Past habitual -k converb + imperfective of en
-k converb + imperfective of sugé
Defective bée + perfective of raaré
bée + perfective of xaaxé
Immediate future positive conjunctive + imperfective of wee

ReferencesEdit

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “bee”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

AiwooEdit

VerbEdit

bee

  1. (intransitive) to grow

ReferencesEdit


AukanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English belly.

NounEdit

bee

  1. belly, stomach
  2. uterus, womb
  3. pregnancy
  4. lineage, family line

ReferencesEdit


DumbeaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bee

  1. fish

ReferencesEdit


EstonianEdit

NounEdit

bee (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter B.

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin .

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeː/, [ˈbe̞ː]
  • Rhymes: -eː
  • Syllabification: bee

NounEdit

bee

  1. bee (The name of the Latin-script letter B.)

Usage notesEdit

  • Speakers often use the corresponding forms of b-kirjain ("letter B, letter b") instead of inflecting this word, especially in plural.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of bee (Kotus type 18/maa, no gradation)
nominative bee beet
genitive been beiden
beitten
partitive beetä beitä
illative beehen beihin
singular plural
nominative bee beet
accusative nom. bee beet
gen. been
genitive been beiden
beitten
partitive beetä beitä
inessive beessä beissä
elative beestä beistä
illative beehen beihin
adessive beellä beillä
ablative beeltä beiltä
allative beelle beille
essive beenä beinä
translative beeksi beiksi
instructive bein
abessive beettä beittä
comitative beineen
Possessive forms of bee (type maa)
possessor singular plural
1st person beeni beemme
2nd person beesi beenne
3rd person beensä

SynonymsEdit


FulaEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Alternative formsEdit

ParticleEdit

bee

  1. it must, it is necessary that
    iggey yimbe bee bonnii taariinde nde no feewi.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Dialectal variantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


HadzaEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

bee f pl (masc. bami, masc. plural bii, fem. bôko)

  1. they (fem. or mixed gender)

Related termsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

An onomatopoeia.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɛɛ]
  • Hyphenation: bee
  • Rhymes:

InterjectionEdit

bee

  1. baa (sound of a sheep)

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

bee

  1. baa (sound of a sheep)

ReferencesEdit

  • bee in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • bee in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

MandinkaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bee

  1. (anatomy) vagina

ManxEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish bíad (food). Cognate with Irish bia and Scottish Gaelic biadh.

NounEdit

bee m (genitive singular bee, plural beeghyn)

  1. food
  2. provisions
  3. nourishment
  4. diet
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

bee

  1. inflection of ve:
    1. future
    2. second-person singular imperative

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bee vee mee
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle EnglishEdit

 
bee

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English bēo, from Proto-Germanic *bijō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bee (plural been or bees)

  1. A bee (insect that collects pollen)
    • a. 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Summoner's Tale”, in The Canterbury Tales, lines 1693-1696:
      Right so as bees out swarmen from an hyve, / Out of the develes ers ther gonne dryve / Twenty thousand freres on a route / And thurghout helle swarmed al aboute...
      Just like bees swarm from a hive / Out of the devil's arse there were driven / Twenty thousand friars on a rout / And throughout hell they swarmed all about...

DescendantsEdit

  • English: bee
  • Scots: bee, be, beye, bie, bea
  • Yola: been (plural)

ReferencesEdit


NavajoEdit

PronunciationEdit

PostpositionEdit

bee

  1. with, by means of, by means of it

InflectionEdit


Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

bee

  1. second-person singular present subjunctive absolute of at·tá

San Juan Guelavía ZapotecEdit

NounEdit

bee

  1. ant

ReferencesEdit

  • López Antonio, Joaquín; Jones, Ted; Jones, Kris (2012) Vocabulario breve del Zapoteco de San Juan Guelavía[3] (in Spanish), second electronic edition, Tlalpan, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., pages 13, 25

Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian bēthe, from Proto-Germanic *bai (both) + *sa (the). Cognates include West Frisian beide and German beide.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

bee

  1. both

PronounEdit

bee

  1. both

Usage notesEdit

  • When used pronominally referring to two people (rather than objects or animals), the plural beeën is used.

ReferencesEdit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “bee”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN

TetumEdit

 
bee

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

NounEdit

bee

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

VõroEdit

NounEdit

bee (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter B.

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bi, from Old English bi, from Proto-West Germanic *bī. Cognates include English by and Scots by.

PrepositionEdit

bee

  1. by

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith