See also: Moo, MOO, moʻo, Moʻo, móo, móó, and möö

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoeic.

PronunciationEdit

Examples
(file)

NounEdit

moo (plural moos)

  1. (onomatopoeia) The characteristic lowing sound made by cattle.
  2. (Britain, slang, mildly derogatory) A foolish woman.
    You silly moo! What did you do that for?
    • 2004, David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas:
      'Aurora House does not expel,' said the sanctimonious moo, 'but you will be medicated, if your behaviour warrants it, for your own protection.'

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

moo (third-person singular simple present moos, present participle mooing, simple past and past participle mooed)

  1. (intransitive) Of a cow or bull, to make its characteristic lowing sound.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

moo

  1. The characteristic sound made by a cow or bull.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ArabelaEdit

NounEdit

moo

  1. river

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

moo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of もお

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish móu, móo, from Proto-Celtic *māyos, comparative form of *māros, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₁-. Cognate with Scottish Gaelic , Irish and Welsh mwy.

AdjectiveEdit

moo

  1. comparative degree of mooar (big, great, large)

See alsoEdit


Murui HuitotoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Huitoto-Ocaina *mōhō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmɔː]
  • Hyphenation: moo

RootEdit

moo

  1. father

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

moo

  1. vocative of mooma (father)

NounEdit

moo

  1. Synonym of mooma (father)

Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Shirley Burtch (1983) Diccionario Huitoto Murui (Tomo I) (Linguistica Peruana No. 20)‎[1] (in Spanish), Yarinacocha, Peru: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 180
  • Katarzyna Izabela Wojtylak (2017) A grammar of Murui (Bue): a Witotoan language of Northwest Amazonia.[2], Townsville: James Cook University press (PhD thesis), page 125

SothoEdit

AdverbEdit

moo

  1. there; distal demonstrative adverb.

UlchEdit

NounEdit

moo

  1. tree, wood

ReferencesEdit

  • Sonya Oskolskaya, Natasha Stoynova, Some Changes in the Noun Paradigm of Ulcha Under the Language Shift, 2017.