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See also: Mort, mórt, mòrt, and mört

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French mort (death).

NounEdit

mort (countable and uncountable, plural morts)

  1. Death; especially, the death of game in hunting.
  2. A note sounded on a horn at the death of a deer.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      The sportsman then sounded a treble mort.
  3. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) The skin of a sheep or lamb that has died of disease.
  4. (card games) A variety of dummy whist for three players.
  5. (card games) The exposed or dummy hand of cards in the game of mort.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Icelandic margt, neuter of margr (many).

NounEdit

mort

  1. A great quantity or number.
    • Charles Dickens
      There was a mort of merrymaking.
    • J. R. R. Tolkien
      As it was, he still had a mort of treasure at home in his cave.

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of mortal.

NounEdit

mort (plural morts)

  1. (Internet, informal) A player in a multi-user dungeon who does not have special administrator privileges and whose character can be killed.
AntonymsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Uncertain.

NounEdit

mort (plural morts)

  1. A three-year-old salmon.

Etymology 5Edit

UK circa 1560–1890.[en 1] Etymology unknown. Documented possibilities include:

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mort (plural morts)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, thieves' cant) A woman; a female.
    • 1621, Ben Jonson, The Gypsies Metamorphosed:
      Male gypsies all, not a mort among them.
    • 1611, Thomas Middleton, The Roaring Girl, Edward Lumley 1840, p. 538:
      I have, by the salomon, a doxy that carries a kinchin mort in her slate at her back, besides my dell and my dainty wild dell, with all whom I'll tumble this next darkmans in the strommel []
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Eric Partridge, The Routledge Dictionary of Historical Slang. Routledge, 1973. →ISBN.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Green, Jonathon (2012) Crooked Talk: Five Hundred Years of the Language of Crime, Random House, →ISBN, page 176
  3. 3.0 3.1 “mort” in Albert Barrère and Charles G[odfrey] Leland, compilers and editors, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, Edinburgh: The Ballantyne Press, 1889–1890.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mors, mortem.

NounEdit

mort m

  1. death

See alsoEdit


BourguignonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mortus.

AdjectiveEdit

mort (feminine mote, masculine plural morts, feminine plural motes)

  1. dead

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin mors.

NounEdit

mort f (plural morts)

  1. death

CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan mort, from Latin mors, mortem, from Proto-Indo-European *mér-tis (death), from *mer- (to die)

NounEdit

mort f (uncountable)

  1. death

mort m (plural morts)

  1. dead person
  2. (colloquial) a difficult problem one must face

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Occitan mort, from Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuus, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, *mr̥tós.

AdjectiveEdit

mort (feminine morta, masculine plural morts, feminine plural mortes)

  1. dead

VerbEdit

mort

  1. past participle of morir
    45.000 persones han mort
    45000 people have died

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔrt

VerbEdit

mort

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of morren
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of morren

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French, from Old French mort, from Vulgar Latin *mortu, from Latin mortuus, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, *mr̥tós.

VerbEdit

mort m (feminine singular morte, masculine plural morts, feminine plural mortes)

  1. past participle of mourir

AdjectiveEdit

mort (feminine singular morte, masculine plural morts, feminine plural mortes)

  1. dead
    Le roi est mort.
    The king is dead.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French mort, from Old French mort, from Latin mors, mortem, from Proto-Indo-European *mértis (death), from *mer- (to die).

NounEdit

mort f (plural morts)

  1. death

NounEdit

mort m (plural morts, feminine morte)

  1. dead person
SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mors, mortem.

NounEdit

mort f (plural mortes)

  1. death

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mort, from Latin mors, mortem.

NounEdit

mort m, f (plural mors)

  1. death

NormanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French mort, from Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuus.

AdjectiveEdit

mort m

  1. (Jersey) dead
    • rouai est mort, lé rouai vit!
      The king is dead, long live the king!
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French mort, from Latin mors, mortem.

NounEdit

mort f (plural morts)

  1. (Jersey) death
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse murtr, murti

NounEdit

mort m (definite singular morten, indefinite plural morter, definite plural mortene)

  1. the common roach, Rutilus rutilus

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse murtr, murti

NounEdit

mort m (definite singular morten, indefinite plural mortar, definite plural mortane)

  1. the common roach, Rutilus rutilus

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan mort, from Latin mors, mortem.

NounEdit

mort f (plural morts)

  1. death

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuus.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mort

  1. past participle of morir

AdjectiveEdit

mort m (oblique and nominative feminine singular morte)

  1. dead
    • circa 1150, Turoldus, La Chanson de Roland:
      Or veit Rollant que mort est sun ami
      Now Roland can see that death is his friend

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin mors, mortem. First attested in Old French in 881 in the Sequence of Saint Eulalia.

NounEdit

mort f (oblique plural morz or mortz, nominative singular mort, nominative plural morz or mortz)

  1. death
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 104 (of the Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, line 1027:
      car sun chant signefie mort
      for his song signifies death

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PicardEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mors.

NounEdit

mort f (plural morts)

  1. death

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuus, from Proto-Indo-European *mr̥twós, *mr̥tós.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mort m, n (feminine singular moartă, masculine plural morți, feminine and neuter plural moarte)

  1. dead

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

mort m (plural morți, feminine equivalent moartă)

  1. dead body, corpse

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *mortu(s), from Latin mortuus.

AdjectiveEdit

mort m (feminine singular morta, masculine plural morts, feminine plural mortas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) dead

Related termsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

mort m (genitive singular moirt, plural moirt)

  1. Alternative form of murt

VerbEdit

mort (past mhort, future mortaidh, verbal noun mort or mortadh, past participle morte)

  1. Alternative form of murt

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Mörtel.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /môrt/
  • Hyphenation: mort

NounEdit

mȍrt m (Cyrillic spelling мо̏рт)

  1. (regional) mortar (masonry)

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mort”, in Hrvatski jezični portal, 2006–2018