See also: trộm

DanishEdit

VerbEdit

trom

  1. imperative of tromme

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

trom f or m (plural trommen, diminutive trommetje n)

  1. drum

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Galway) IPA(key): /t̪ˠɾˠuːmˠ/

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish trom (elder-tree).

NounEdit

trom m (genitive singular troim, nominative plural troim)

  1. elder (tree, bush)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish trom (heavy), from Proto-Celtic *trummos (compare Welsh trwm).

AdjectiveEdit

trom (genitive singular masculine trom, genitive singular feminine troime, plural troma, comparative troime)

  1. heavy
    1. of great weight
    2. of high specific gravity
    3. of heavy texture
    4. stodgy; hard to digest
    5. dense, thick
    6. abundant
    7. of great force or intensity
    8. laborious
    9. burdensome
    10. grievous, severe
    11. harsh, tyrannous
    12. unsparing
    13. sultry, oppressive
    14. weighty, profound; important
    15. dull, tedious
    16. laboured
      1. drowsy
      2. deep, slumberous
    17. oppressed, sad
DeclensionEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

trom m (genitive singular trom, nominative plural troma)

  1. weight
    1. a weight; burden, oppression
    2. (abstract) weight
  2. bulk, preponderance
  3. importance
  4. blame, censure
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
trom throm dtrom
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

trom

  1. Alternative form of trome

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *trummos (compare Welsh trwm).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trom

  1. heavy (weight)
  2. heavy, severe, grievous, difficult
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14d17
      coní árim-se peccad libsi uili, ꝉ ara·tart-sa fortacht dúibsi, arnap trom fuirib for n‑oínur
      so that I may not count sin with you all, or so that I may give aid to you lest it be heavy on you by yourselves
  3. (by extension) sad, sorrowful
  4. great, vast, powerful, mighty

InflectionEdit

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative trom trom trom
Vocative truim*
trom**
Accusative trom truim
Genitive truim truime truim
Dative trom truim trom
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative truim troma
Vocative tromu
troma
Accusative tromu
troma
Genitive trom
Dative tromaib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: trom
  • Manx: trome
  • Scottish Gaelic: trom

NounEdit

trom n

  1. weight, heaviness, burden
  2. greater part, bulk
  3. severity, distress, difficulty, sorrow
  4. blame, censure

InflectionEdit

Neuter o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative tromN tromN tromL, troma
Vocative tromN tromN tromL, troma
Accusative tromN tromN tromL, troma
Genitive truimL trom tromN
Dative tromL tromaib tromaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
trom throm trom
pronounced with /d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese trõo, from trõar, or alternatively from Latin tonus (thunderclap; sound, tone), probably through a Late Latin or Vulgar Latin form *tronus, influenced by *tronitus < tonitrus, and ultimately from Ancient Greek τόνος (tónos). Compare Galician trono, Spanish trueno, Catalan tro, Occitan tron. See also tom, a possible doublet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trom m (plural trons)

  1. boom (loud, resonant sound)

SynonymsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish trom, from Proto-Celtic *trummos (compare Welsh trwm).

AdjectiveEdit

trom (comparative truime)

  1. heavy
  2. hard, difficult
  3. weighty, serious
  4. depressed, melancholy
  5. addicted
    Tha e trom air òl. / Tha e trom air an deoch.He's a heavy drinker.
    Tha mi trom air an tombaca.I'm a heavy smoker.
  6. (typography) bold
    clò trombold type
  7. pregnant (with child)

Usage notesEdit

  • In connection with "love" can precede (and lenite) the noun:
    Ghabh e trom ghaol oirre.He fell madly in love with her.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trȍm (definite trȍmī, comparative tromiji, Cyrillic spelling тро̏м)

  1. sluggish, slow

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

trom

  1. feminine singular of trwm

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
trom drom nhrom throm
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.