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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mot, from Old English mot (grain of sand; mote; atom), but of uncertain ultimate origin. Sometimes linked to Spanish mota (speck) and English mud.[1].

Compare West Frisian mot (peat dust), Dutch mot (dust from turf; sawdust; grit), Norwegian mutt (speck; mote; splinter; chip).

NounEdit

mote (plural motes)

  1. A small particle; a speck.
    • Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.
    • a. 1729, Edward Taylor, "Meditation. Joh. 14.2. I go to prepare a place for you":
      What shall a Mote up to a Monarch rise?
      An Emmet match an Emperor in might?
    • 1979, J.G. Ballard, The Unlimited Dream Company, chapter 9:
      I wanted to shrink myself to a mote of dust, plunge into this pool I held in my own cyclopean hands, soar down these runs of light to places where light itself was born from this colloquy of dust.
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English moten, from Old English mōtan (to be allowed, be able to, have the opportunity to, be compelled to, may, must), from Proto-Germanic *mōtaną (to be able to, have to, be delegated), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (to acquire, possess, be in charge of). Cognate with Dutch moeten (to have to, must), German müssen (to have to, must), Danish måtte (might, may), Ancient Greek μέδω (médō, to prevail, dominate, rule over). Related to empty.

VerbEdit

mote (third-person singular simple present mote, present participle -, simple past and past participle must)

  1. (archaic) May or might. [from 9th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      he [] kept aloofe for dread to be descryde, / Untill fit time and place he mote espy, / Where he mote worke him scath and villeny.
  2. (obsolete) Must. [9th-17th c.]
  3. (archaic) Forming subjunctive expressions of wish: may. [from 9th c.]
    • 1980, Erica Jong, Fanny:
      ‘I shall not take Vengeance into my own Hands. The Goddess will do what She will.’ ‘So mote it be,’ said the Grandmaster.
Usage notesEdit
  • Generally takes an infinitive without to.

Etymology 3Edit

See moot (a meeting).

NounEdit

mote (plural motes)

  1. (obsolete) A meeting for discussion.
    a wardmote in the city of London
  2. (obsolete) A body of persons who meet for discussion, especially about the management of affairs.
    a folk mote
  3. (obsolete) A place of meeting for discussion.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From remote, with allusion to the other sense of mote (a speck of dust).

NounEdit

mote (plural motes)

  1. A tiny computer for remote sensing; a component element of smartdust.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Worcester, Joseph Emerson (1910: Worcester's academic dictionary: a new etymological dictionary of the English language, p. 371

AnagramsEdit


Inari SamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Samic *moδē.

NounEdit

mote

  1. mud

InflectionEdit

Even e-stem, t-đ gradation
Nominative mote
Genitive mođe
Singular Plural
Nominative mote mođeh
Accusative mođe muuđijd
Genitive mođe muđij
muuđij
Illative motán muuđijd
Locative moođeest muuđijn
Comitative muuđijn muđijguin
Abessive mođettáá muđijttáá
Essive motteen
Partitive motteed
Possessive forms
Singular Dual Plural
1st person
2nd person
3rd person

Further readingEdit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mote f pl

  1. plural of mota

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

mote

  1. Rōmaji transcription of もて

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

mōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of mōtus

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From French mode

NounEdit

mote m (definite singular moten, indefinite plural moter, definite plural motene)

  1. fashion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From French mode

NounEdit

mote m (definite singular moten, indefinite plural motar, definite plural motane)

  1. fashion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

mote m (plural motes)

  1. motto

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmote/, [ˈmot̪e]

Etymology 1Edit

From French or Provençal mot (saying).

NounEdit

mote m (plural motes)

  1. nickname
  2. motto (heraldry)
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Quechua mut'i.

NounEdit

mote m (plural motes)

  1. (South America) hulled cereal, especially pearl barley and hominy
Derived termsEdit

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

mote

  1. dative singular of mot