mote

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English mot, from Old English mot ‎(grain of sand).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mote ‎(plural motes)

  1. A small particle; a speck.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Matthew 7:5:
      Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother’s eye.
  2. A tiny computer for remote sensing. Also known as smartdust.
See alsoEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English moten, from Old English mōtan ‎(to be allowed, be able to, have the opportunity to, be compelled to, may, must), from Proto-Germanic *mōtaną ‎(to be able to, have to, be delegated), from Proto-Indo-European *med- ‎(to acquire, possess, be in charge of). Cognate with Dutch moeten ‎(to have to, must), German müssen ‎(to have to, must), Danish måtte ‎(might, may), Ancient Greek μέδω ‎(médō, to prevail, dominate, rule over). Related to empty.

VerbEdit

mote

  1. (now archaic) May or might. [from 9th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.7:
      he […] kept aloofe for dread to be descryde, / Untill fit time and place he mote espy, / Where he mote worke him scath and villeny.
  2. (obsolete) Must. [9th-17th c.]
  3. (now archaic) Forming subjunctive expressions of wish: may. [from 9th c.]
    • 1980, Erica Jong, Fanny:
      ‘I shall not take Vengeance into my own Hands. The Goddess will do what She will.’ ‘So mote it be,’ said the Grandmaster.
Usage notesEdit
  • Generally takes an infinitive without to.

Etymology 3Edit

See moot ‎(a meeting).

NounEdit

mote ‎(plural motes)

  1. (obsolete) A meeting for discussion.
    a wardmote in the city of London
  2. (obsolete) A body of persons who meet for discussion, especially about the management of affairs.
    a folkmote
  3. (obsolete) A place of meeting for discussion.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mote f

  1. plural of mota

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

mote

  1. rōmaji reading of もて

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

mōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of mōtus

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From French mode

NounEdit

mote m ‎(definite singular moten, indefinite plural moter, definite plural motene)

  1. fashion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From French mode

NounEdit

mote m ‎(definite singular moten, indefinite plural motar, definite plural motane)

  1. fashion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

mote m (plural motes)

  1. motto

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French or Provençal mot ‎(saying).

NounEdit

mote m ‎(plural motes)

  1. nickname
  2. motto (heraldry)

Etymology 2Edit

From Quechua mut'i

NounEdit

mote m ‎(plural motes)

  1. (South America) hulled cereal, especially pearl barley and hominy
Derived termsEdit

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

mote

  1. dative singular of mot
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