See also: Tome, tomé, Tomé, and -tome

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French tome, from Latin tomus (section of larger work), from Ancient Greek τόμος (tómos, section, roll of papyrus, volume), from τέμνω (témnō, I cut, separate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tome (plural tomes)

  1. One in a series of volumes.
  2. A large or scholarly book.
    The professor pulled a dusty old tome from the bookshelf.
    • 2019 May 19, Alex McLevy, “The final Game Of Thrones brings a pensive but simple meditation about stories (newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1]:
      And Sam presents Tyrion with A Song Of Ice And Fire, a tome in which Tyrion’s own role, far from that of the clever hero or Machiavellian snake, doesn’t even exist.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

tome

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of tomar

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tomus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tome m (plural tomes)

  1. tome, volume
  2. section
  3. subaltern

Etymology 2Edit

From Franco-Provençal tomme, likely from sense 1 in the sense of asking for a slice of cheese.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tome f (plural tomes)

  1. A variety of mountain cheese

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Oxford University Press (2016): The Oxford Companion to Cheese

GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

tome

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of tomar

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

tome

  1. Rōmaji transcription of とめ

LatinEdit

NounEdit

tome m

  1. vocative singular of tomus

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English tōm and Old Norse tómr, both from Proto-Germanic *tōmaz (free, clear, empty).

AdjectiveEdit

tome

  1. empty, hollow
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: toom
  • Scots: tume, tuim

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse tom (leisure, ease). Compare Icelandic tóm (empty space; leisure).

NounEdit

tome (uncountable)

  1. free time, leisure
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

AdjectiveEdit

tome

  1. (Southwest, southern West Midlands) Alternative form of tame (tame)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tome

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of tomar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of tomar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of tomar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of tomar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

tome

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of tomar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of tomar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of tomar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of tomar.