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EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μῦθος (mûthos, word, humour, companion, speech, account, rumour, fable). English since 1830.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɪθ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪθ

NounEdit

myth (plural myths)

  1. A traditional story which embodies a belief regarding some fact or phenomenon of experience, and in which often the forces of nature and of the soul are personified; a sacred narrative regarding a god, a hero, the origin of the world or of a people, etc.
  2. (uncountable) Such stories as a genre.
    Myth was the product of man's emotion and imagination, acted upon by his surroundings. (E. Clodd, Myths & Dreams (1885), 7, cited after OED)
  3. A commonly-held but false belief, a common misconception; a fictitious or imaginary person or thing; a popular conception about a real person or event which exaggerates or idealizes reality.
  4. A person or thing held in excessive or quasi-religious awe or admiration based on popular legend
    Father Flanagan was legendary, his institution an American myth. (Tucson (Arizona) Citizen, 20 September 1979, 5A/3, cited after OED)
  5. A person or thing existing only in imagination, or whose actual existence is not verifiable.
    • Ld. Lytton
      As for Mrs. Primmins's bones, they had been myths these twenty years.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


WelshEdit

NounEdit

myth

  1. Nasal mutation of byth.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
byth fyth myth unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.