See also: Legend

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English legende, from Old French legende, from Medieval Latin legenda (a legend, story, especially the lives of the saints), from Latin legenda (things which ought to be read), from lego (I read).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛdʒ.ənd/
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NounEdit

legend (countable and uncountable, plural legends)

  1. An unrealistic story depicting past events.
    1. A story of unknown origin describing plausible but extraordinary past events.
      Synonym: myth
      The legend of Troy was discovered to have a historical basis.
    2. A plausible story set in the historical past, but whose historicity is uncertain.
      the legend of Robin Hood
    3. A story in which a kernel of truth is embellished to an unlikely degree.
      Synonyms: myth, tall tale
      The 1984 Rose Bowl prank has spawned many legends. Here's the real story.
    4. A fabricated backstory for a spy, with associated documents and records.
      Synonym: cover story
      According to his legend, he once worked for the Red Cross, spreading humanitarian aid in Africa.
      • 1992, Ronald Kessler, Inside the CIA, 1994 Pocket Books edition, →ISBN, page 115:
        If the documents are needed to establish "a light legend," meaning a superficial cover story, no steps are taken to make sure that if someone calls the college or motor vehicle department, the name on the document will be registered.
      • 2003, Rodney Carlisle, The Complete Idiot's Guide to Spies and Espionage, Alpha Books, →ISBN, page 105:
        Sorge solidified his own position by returning to Germany and developing a new legend. He joined the Nazi Party [] .
      • 2005, Curtis Peebles, Twilight Warriors, Naval Institute Press, →ISBN, page 25:
        Both the agent's legend and documents were intended to stand up against casual questions from Soviet citizens, such as during a job interview, or a routine police document check, such as were made at railway stations.
  2. A person related to a legend or legends.
    1. A leading protagonist in a historical legend.
      Synonym: hero
      Achilles is a legend in Greek culture.
    2. A person with legend-like qualities, such as extraordinary accomplishment.
      Michael Jordan stands as a legend in basketball.
      1. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial, slang) A cool, nice or helpful person, especially one who is male.
        Synonym: brick
        I've lost my pen! —Here mate, borrow mine. —You legend.
  3. A key to the symbols and color codes on a map, chart, etc.
    Synonyms: guide, key
    According to the legend on the map, that building is a school.
  4. (numismatics, heraldry) An inscription, motto, or title, especially one surrounding the field in a medal or coin, or placed upon a heraldic shield or beneath an engraving or illustration.
    Synonym: inscription
  5. A musical composition set to a poetical story.
  6. (naval) The design and specification of a vessel.
    • 1929, Journal of the American Society of Naval Engineers, Inc (page 304)
      The legend displacement on the basis then in use was 48,000 tons, the corresponding standard displacement as defined by the Washington Treaty being 47,540 tons.
    • 1976, Alan Raven, ‎John Roberts, British Battleships of World War Two: The Development and Technical History of the Royal Navy's Battleships and Battlecruisers from 1911 to 1946 (page 63)
      The legend and sketch designs were submitted to the Board on 27th March 1916 and, after examining a model and the drawings, the Sea Lords generally favoured proposal 'B'; the extra weight involved being acceptable.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

legend (third-person singular simple present legends, present participle legending, simple past and past participle legended)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To tell or narrate; to recount.
    • c. 1600, Joseph Hall, Satires
      Nor ladie's wanton love , nor wand'ring knight,
      Legend I out in rymes all richly dight

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticipleEdit

legend

  1. present participle of legen

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of legend
uninflected legend
inflected legende
positive
predicative/adverbial legend
legende
indefinite m./f. sing. legende
n. sing. legend
plural legende
definite legende
partitive legends

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

legend

  1. present participle of legen

PolishEdit

NounEdit

legend

  1. genitive plural of legenda

SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin legenda

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

legend c

  1. legend

DeclensionEdit

Declension of legend 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative legend legenden legender legenderna
Genitive legends legendens legenders legendernas

ReferencesEdit

legend in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

AnagramsEdit