Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin obnoxiōsus (hurtful, injurious, dangerous), from obnoxius (punishable; liable to danger), from ob (against; facing) + noxia (hurt, injury, damage).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

obnoxious (comparative more obnoxious, superlative most obnoxious)

  1. Extremely unpleasant, offensive, very annoying, odious or contemptible.
    He was an especially obnoxious and detestable specimen of a man.
    Throwing stones at the bus is another example of your obnoxious behaviour.
  2. (preceded by "to feel") Ashamed; acutely aware of one's own offensive qualities.
    to feel obnoxious
    • 1989, Antônio Torres, Blues for a Lost Childhood: A Novel of Brazil, page 41:
      Someone jolted my arm and the contents of my glass spilled onto an immaculate white dress. I felt obnoxious.
    • 2013, Catherine Hilterbrant, Drive-by Psychosis, ISBN 146977836X, page 51:
      I always feel out of place when I am around people. I feel obnoxious if I laugh or talk too much.
    • 2013, Molly Cutpurse, Dark Man, ISBN 1291533036, page 44:
      He felt obnoxious and knew perfectly well that he would have no explanation whatsoever had anyone discovered him, but she looked so alluring, so untroubled, so fortunate, that his only concern was the terrible crack the shutter made...quiet as it was.
  3. (archaic) exposed to harm or injury.
    • 1661, Robert Boyle, The Sceptical Chymist, page 26,
      To begin then with his Experiment of the burning Wood, it seems to me to be obnoxious to not a few considerable Exceptions.

TranslationsEdit