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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English [Term?], from Latin prohibeo (I fend off, prevent, prohibit) (through past participle prohibitus).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹəˈhɪbɪt/, /pɹəʊˈhɪbɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /pɹoʊˈhɪbɪt/, /pɹəˈhɪbət/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪbɪt

VerbEdit

prohibit (third-person singular simple present prohibits, present participle prohibiting, simple past and past participle prohibited)

  1. (transitive) To forbid, disallow, or proscribe officially; to make illegal or illicit.
    • 2013 June 7, Ed Pilkington, “‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 6:
      In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.
    The restaurant prohibits smoking on the patio.
    Synonyms: ban, disallow, forbid
    Antonyms: allow, authorize

SynonymsEdit

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CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prohibit (feminine prohibida, masculine plural prohibits, feminine plural prohibides)

  1. forbidden, outlawed

VerbEdit

prohibit m (feminine prohibida, masculine plural prohibits, feminine plural prohibides)

  1. past participle of prohibir