See also: Quin, quin-, and -quin

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

quin (plural quins)

  1. (informal) A quintuplet.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

quin (plural quins)

  1. A European scallop, Pecten opercularis, used as food.
    • 1973, N. L. Tranter, Population since the industrial revolution (page 104)
      Similarly the stocks of the free-living scallops and quins, which are caught by trawling, are threatened by over-fishing to supply the market for canned or frozen luxury sea-foods.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin quinam.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

quin (feminine quina, masculine plural quins, feminine plural quines)

  1. (interrogative) which, what
  2. what a

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

quin

  1. (Quebec, colloquial) (surprise, giving someone something) alternative form of tiens

IdoEdit

PronounEdit

quin

  1. (interrogative) whom (plural) (object)

Usage notesEdit

To ask for a subject, use qui instead.


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From instrumental quī + ne.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quīn (not comparable)

  1. (usually with present indicative) how come not, why don't I/you/he ..., how about? (in questioning suggestions)
    Synonyms: quid est quod nōn, cūr nōn, quārē nōn?
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 10.17:
      'Quid per agrōs' inquit 'vagāmur vīcātim circumferentēs bellum? Quīn urbēs et moenia adgredimur?...'
      He said, "Why are we roaming through the fields waging war from village to village? Why don't we attack the cities and (their) walls?..."
    • c. 190 BCE, Plautus, Curculio 84:
      Quīn tū tacēs!
      Why don't you shut up!
    1. (in commands with imperative, subjunctive or future) come on, let's, ...then! (adding force)
      Synonyms: age, fac
      • 161 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Phormio 881:
        GETA Ego sum missu(s) tē ut requīrerem atque addūcerem. ANTIPHO Em quīn ergō rape mē - quid cessās?
        GETA I've been sent to find and bring you back. ANTIPHO Well, here I am - grab me then! What are you waiting for?
  2. (emphatic) Used to corroborate or amplify the previous statement: and even, and in fact
    1. Strengthened by various adverbs:
      quīn etiamand moreover
      quīn etand furthermore
      quīn potiusin fact, rather
      quīn contrāand even on the contrary
      quīn immōnot at all, and even
      • 70 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Georgica 3.457:
        Quīn etiam īma dolor, bālantum lāpsus ad ossa...
        Even the inner pain, gone to the bones of the bleaters (i.e. the sheep)...
      • c. 69 CE – 122 CE, Suetonius, De Vita Caesarum Divi Augusti.96:
        Quīn et bellōrum omnium ēventūs ante praesēnsit.
        He even predicted the outcomes of all his wars beforehand.
    2. Used to emphasise an objection to the previous statement: why, but ...!
      • c. 190–185, Plautus, Amphitryon 410-411:
        SOSIA Quid, malum, non sum ego servos Amphitruōnis Sōsia? [] MERCVRIVS Quid, domum vostram? SO. Ita enim vērō! MER. Quīn quae dīxisti modo omnia ēmentītu·s: equidem Sōsia Amphitruōnis sum!
        SOSIA What the hell? Am I not Sosia, Amphitryon's slave? [] MERCURY What, your house?! SO. Yes, my house! MER. Why, but everything you've just said you've dreamt up: Amphitryon's Sosia is me!
      • c. 190–185, Plautus, Amphitryon 616-617:
        AMPHITRVO Nimia memorās mīra. Sed vīdīstīn uxōrem meam? SOSIA Quīn intrō īre in aedīs numquam licitum est! AM. Quis tē prohibuit?
        AMPHITRYON What a strange story you're telling me! But have you seen my wife? SOSIA But I've been told to never ever enter the house! AM. Who told you not to?

ConjunctionEdit

quīn

  1. (used with a negative like nēmō or nūllus) who does/can/would not (usually following a nominative)
    Synonym: quī/quae/quod nōn (in the nominative mostly)
    • 106 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, Pro Roscio Amerino 154:
      Vestrum nēmō est quīn intellegat populum Rōmānum
      There is no one among you who doesn't understand the Roman people
    • 100 BCE – 44 BCE, Julius Caesar, De Bello Civili 2.5:
      Neque erat quisquam omnium quīn in eius diēī cāsū suārum omnium fortūnārum ēventum cōnsistere existimāret.
      Nor was there anyone among them who didn't think that the fate of all their fortunes rested on the outcome of that day.
  2. (used with a negative like numquam or nōn) without (something happening), (so) that...not
    Synonym: ut nōn
    • 163 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos 68, (complaining at an old man for working too much):
      Numquam tam māne ēgredior, neque tam vesperī domum revortor, quīn tē in fundō cōnspicer fodere aut []
      I never go out so early, or come home so late, that I don't see you digging or [] on your farm.
    • 100 BCE – 44 BCE, Julius Caesar, De Bello Civili 3.47:
      Neque ūllus flāre ventus poterat quīn aliquā ex parte secundum cursum habērent.
      And no wind could blow that it wasn't favourable to them to some extent.
  3. (preceded by nōn, followed by sed quod/quia) not because not...but, not that not...but
    Synonym: (nōn) quod/quia...nōn
    • 106 BCE – 43 BCE, Cicero, Ad Familiares 4.7:
      nōn quīn ab eō ipse dissentiam, sed quod eā tē sapientiā esse iūdicem, ut meum cōnsilium nōn antepōnam tuō
      not because I don't disagree with it, but because I judge you to be of the kind of wisdom where I wouldn't prefer my own opinion to yours
    • c. 125 CE – 180 CE, Apuleius, Florida 16:
      nōn quīn magnitūdō Carthāginis mereātur etiam a philosophō precem prō honōre, sed ut integrum et intemerātum esset vestrum beneficium
      not because the great city of Carthage doesn't deserve that even a philosopher beg to be given an honor, but so that your generosity remained pure and irreproachable
  4. (used with negated verbs of hindering or desisting) from doing something/happening, lest I/you/they do something
    Synonym: quōminus,
    • 2nd c. CE, Festus, De Verborum Significatione :
      "Necessārium" ait esse Opillus Aurēlius, in quō nōn sit cessandum, [] aut quod nōn possit prohibēre quīn fīat.
      'The necessary', says Opillus Aurelius, 'is that which doesn't allow for delays, [] or that which one can't prevent from happening.'
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate Ecclesiastes.2.10:
      Et omnia quae dēsīderāvērunt oculī meī, nōn negāvi eīs; nec prohibuī cor quīn omnī voluptāte fruerētur...
      And anything that my eyes desired, I did not deny to them. Nor did I withhold my heart from enjoying every pleasure...
    • 405 CE, Jerome, Vulgate 2 Samuelis.2.21:
      Nōluit autem Asahel omittere quīn urgueret eum.
      But Asahel did not want to stop pursuing him.
  5. (used with negated words of hesitation, doubting, not knowing) that
    quis ignōrat, quīn ...?
    who's oblivious to the fact that ...?
    • 161 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Eunuchus 997:
      Nōn dubium·st quin mī magnum ex hāc rē sit malum.
      There's no doubt that I'll sorely regret this.
    • 1st c. CE, Curtius Rufus, Historiae Alexandri Magni 4.10.29:
      Nec dubitāvit Dārēus quīn interfecta esset, quia nequīsset contumēliam perpetī, exclāmatque āmēns dolōre: "Quod ego tantum nefās commīsī, Alexander?..."
      And Darius had no doubt that she [his wife] had been killed, because she had been unable to endure great offense, and so he shouted in a frenzy from the pain, "What great crime have I committed, Alexander?!.."

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

  • quin in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • quin in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • quin in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to devote every spare moment to...; to work without intermission at a thing: nullum tempus intermittere, quin (also ab opere, or ad opus)
    • to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: vix mihi tempero quin lacrimem
    • to be hardly able to restrain one's tears: vix me contineo quin lacrimem
    • to make all possible haste to..: nullam moram interponere, quin (Phil. 10. 1. 1)

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin quinam (who, which). Cognate with Catalan quin and with Franco-Provençal quint from a merging of Latin quinam and quantus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kin/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

quin m (feminine singular quina, masculine plural quins, feminine plural quinas)

  1. (interrogative) which
    Quinas veituras son las teunas ?
    Which cars are yours?
  2. (interrogative) what
    Quina ora es ?
    What time is it?
  3. (exclamative) what
    Quina catastròfa !
    What a catastrophe!

SynonymsEdit

  • qual (for animate objects)
  • que (for inanimate objects)

Derived termsEdit