See also: UT, ut-, -ut, út, ût, üt, ǖt, and -uț

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ut, from the first word of Ut queant laxis, the medieval hymn which solfège was based on because its lines started on each note of the scale successively.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ut ‎(plural uts)

  1. (music, dated) Syllable (formerly) used in solfège to represent the first note of a major scale.

Usage notesEdit

  • In solfège, ut has been replaced by do.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ut m ‎(plural ut)

  1. (music) ut (do) the note 'C'.

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

ūt

  1. Romanization of 𐌿𐍄

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier *cuti or *quoti, derived from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis, *kʷos and *só. See ubi for the loss of c.

Jussive and optative sentences were often followed by some adverbial ut(i), originally meaning "in some way" (sometimes interchangeable with instrumental qui(by some means)). Ut becoming habitual, lost its full meaning and was weakened to the conjunction ut, which now felt to govern the subjunctive mood. This was the epitome of the evolution of subordinate clauses in Latin.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ut ‎(not comparable)

  1. (interrogative) how? in what way?
  2. (relative) as

ConjunctionEdit

ut ‎(followed by the subjunctive)

  1. that, so that, to, in order to, in order that
    • Spero ut pacem habeant semper.
      I hope that they may always have peace.
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 2:4
      tollensque illud portavit ad domum suam occulte ut dum sol occubuisset caute sepeliret eum (And taking it up carried it privately to his house, that after the sun was down, he might bury him cautiously.)
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 3:25
      et missus est angelus Domini sanctus Rafahel ut curaret ambos quorum uno tempore fuerat oratio in conspectu Domini recitata (And the holy angel of the Lord, Raphael was sent to heal them both, whose prayers at one time were rehearsed in the sight of the Lord.)
  2. although

ut ‎(followed by the indicative)

  1. as, just as
    • 45 BC, Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, Book II.42
      Ut ager, quamvis fertilis, sine cultura fructuosus esse non potest, sic sine doctrina animus.
      Just as the field, however fertile, without cultivation cannot be fruitful, likewise the soul without education.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ut in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ut in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.ut”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the frost set in so severely that..: tanta vis frigoris insecuta est, ut
    • I cannot wait till..: nihil mihi longius est or videtur quam dum or quam ut
    • it is high time that..: tempus maximum est, ut
    • a man of considerable learning for those times: vir ut temporibus illis doctus
    • the matter has gone so far that...; the state of affairs is such that..: res eo or in eum locum deducta est, ut...
    • I was induced by several considerations to..: multae causae me impulerunt ad aliquid or ut...
    • it is no longer in my power: mihi non est integrum, ut...
    • to give a man the opportunity of doing a thing: facultatem alicui dare alicuius rei or ut possit...
    • to be induced by a consideration: adduci aliqua re (ad aliquid or ut...)
    • to take great pains in order to..: studiose (diligenter, enixe, sedulo, maxime) dare operam, ut...
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omnibus viribusor nervis contendere, ut
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: omni ope atque opera or omni virium contentione eniti, ut
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: contendere et laborare, ut
    • to strain every nerve, do one's utmost in a matter: pro viribus eniti et laborare, ut
    • to induce a person to think that..: aliquem ad eam cogitationem adducere ut
    • I think that..: in hac sum sententia, ut...putem
    • according to my opinion: ut mea fert opinio
    • according to my opinion: ut mihi quidem videtur
    • I am gradually convinced that..: addūcor, ut credam
    • I cannot make myself believe that..: non possum adduci, ut (credam)
    • to form a plan, make a resolution: consilium capere, inire (de aliqua re, with Gen. gerund., with Inf., more rarely ut)
    • to give a person advice: auctorem esse alicui, ut
    • I cannot bring myself to..: a me impetrare non possum, ut
    • my intention is..: consilium est c. Inf. or ut
    • my intention is..: id sequor, ut
    • the matter tends towards..., has this object.[1: res eo spectat, ut
    • with the intention of..: eo consilio, ea mente, ut
    • he had such an extraordinary memory that..: memoria tanta fuit, ut
    • to have a superficial knowledge, a smattering of literature, of the sciences: primis (ut dicitur) or primoribus labris gustare or attingere litteras
    • for a Roman he is decidedly well educated: sunt in illo, ut in homine Romano, multae litterae (De Sen. 4. 12)
    • to do a thing which is not one's vocation, which goes against the grain: adversante et repugnante natura or invitā Minervā (ut aiunt) aliquid facere (Off. 1. 31. 110)
    • systematic succession, concatenation: continuatio seriesque rerum, ut alia ex alia nexa et omnes inter se aptae colligataeque sint (N. D. 1. 4. 9)
    • it follows from this that..: sequitur (not ex quo seq.) ut
    • it follows from this that..: ex quo, unde, hinc efficitur ut
    • to pass from myth to history: ut a fabulis ad facta veniamus
    • as Homer sings (not canit): ut ait Homerus
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: verum ut ad id, unde digressa est oratio, revertamur
    • the task I have put before myself is..: mihi propositum est c. Inf. (or mihi proposui, ut)
    • anger is defined as a passionate desire for revenge: iracundiam sic (ita) definiunt, ut ulciscendi libidinem esse dicant or ut u. libido sit or iracundiam sic definiunt, ulc. libidinem
    • the word aemulatio is employed with two meanings, in a good and a bad sense: aemulatio dupliciter dicitur, ut et in laude et in vitio hoc nomen sit
    • as the proverb says: ut est in proverbio
    • as the proverb says: ut or quod or quomodo aiunt, ut or quemadmodum dicitur
    • to lose one's composure; to be disconcerted: de gradu deici, ut dicitur
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • there is nothing I am more interested in than..: nihil antiquius or prius habeo quam ut (nihil mihi antiquius or potius est, quam ut)
    • this is a characteristic of virtue, it..: virtus hoc habet, ut...
    • to promise an oath to..: iureiurando ac fide se obstringere, ut
    • good-bye; farewell: vale or cura ut valeas
    • it is customary to..: mos (moris) est, ut (Brut. 21. 84)
    • as usually happens: ut fit, ita ut fit, ut fere fit
    • as usually happens: ut solet, ut fieri solet
    • as you sow, so will you reap: ut sementem feceris, ita metes (proverb.) (De Or. 2. 65)
    • a man's policy is aiming at, directed towards..: alicuius in re publica or capessendae rei publicae consilia eo spectant, ut...
    • to propose a law in the popular assembly: legem ferre or simply ferre ad populum, ut...
    • Solo ordained by law that..: Solo lege sanxit, ut or ne
    • the laws of Solon ordained that..: Solonis legibus sanctum erat, ut or ne
    • on condition of..: ea lege, ut
    • to form a conspiracy: coniurare (inter se) de c. Gerund. or ut...
    • to issue a proclamation calling on the senators to assemble in full force: edicere, ut senatus frequens adsit (Fam. 11. 6. 2)
    • the senate decreed (and the people ratified the decree) that..: senatus decrevit (populusque iussit) ut
    • to take care not to..: non committere, ut...
    • to ordain as punishment that..: hanc poenam constituere in aliquem, ut...
    • peace is concluded on condition that..: pax convenit in eam condicionem, ut...
    • as Cicero says: ut ait Cicero (always in this order)
    • to use Cicero's expression; to say with Cicero (not ut cum Cicerone loquar): ut Ciceronis verbis utar
    • so to speak (used to modify a figurative expression): ut ita dicam
    • not to mention..: ut non (nihil) dicam de...
    • to say nothing further on..: ut plura non dicam
    • to put it briefly: ut breviter dicam
    • in short; to be brief: ut paucis (rem) absolvam
    • in short; to be brief: ut paucis (brevi, breviter) complectar
    • in short; to be brief: ut brevi comprehendam
    • in short; to be brief: ut brevi praecīdam
    • to sum up..: ut eorum, quae dixi, summam faciam
    • to use the mildest expression: ut levissime dicam (opp. ut gravissimo verbo utar)
    • to express myself more plainly: ut planius dicam
    • to put it more exactly: ut verius dicam
    • to say once for all: ut semel or in perpetuum dicam
    • to use the same simile, illustration: ut in eodem simili verser
    • to use this example: ut hoc utar or afferam
    • as I said above: ut supra (opp. infra) diximus, dictum est
    • this is not the place to..: non est hic locus, ut...
    • putting aside, except: ut omittam c. Accus.
    • to except the fact that..: ut praetermittam c. Acc. c. Inf.
  1. ^ Palmer, L.R. (1906) The Latin Language, London, Faber and Faber

MeriamEdit

NounEdit

ut

  1. sleep

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

PrepositionEdit

ut

  1. out (direction)

InterjectionEdit

ut

  1. get out!

See alsoEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

PrepositionEdit

ut

  1. out (direction)

InterjectionEdit

ut

  1. get out!

See alsoEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ūt, from Proto-Indo-European *ud. Cognate with Old Saxon ūt (Dutch uit), Old High German ūz (German aus), Old Norse út (Swedish ut), Gothic 𐌿𐍄(ut).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ūt

  1. out

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ūt, whence also Old English, Old Dutch, and Old Frisian ūt, Old High German ūz, Old Norse út.

AdverbEdit

ūt

  1. out

PrepositionEdit

ūt

  1. out of

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse út, from Proto-Germanic *ūt.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ut (not comparable)

  1. out (direction)

InterjectionEdit

ut

  1. get out!

PostpositionEdit

ut

  1. from a certain point within a timespan until the end of that timespan is passed (and further in time)

Usage notesEdit

  • året ut
    Until the end of this year (and possibly further)
  • Detta resultat stod sig matchen ut
    This result lasted for the rest of the game,
    This result lasted until the game was over (and further, is still valid unless something else is known)

See alsoEdit


TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ut ‎(definite accusative udu, plural utlar)

  1. lute

DeclensionEdit