See also: SED, šed, șed, and séð

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

From stream editor.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

sed

  1. (computing) A noninteractive text editor (originally developed in Unix), intended for making systematic edits in an automatic or batch-oriented way.

VerbEdit

sed (third-person singular simple present seds, present participle sedding, simple past and past participle sedded)

  1. (neologism, slang) To edit a file or stream of text using sed.
    Can you sed out those trailing spaces, please?

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sed (plural seds)

  1. (fishing) A line fastening a fish-hook.
    Synonym: snood

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

sed

  1. Eye dialect spelling of said.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From sedět, sedat, sednout.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛt]
  • Hyphenation: sed

NounEdit

sed m inan

  1. sitting position

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sed in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • sed in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sed.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [sed]
  • Hyphenation: sed
  • (file)

ConjunctionEdit

sed

  1. but

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto sed, from Latin sed

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

sed

  1. (archaic) but

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From se, by analogy with eed and cheched.

ConjunctionEdit

sed

  1. (literary, rare, archaic) Alternative form of se for euphony before a vowel, especially /e/ or /ɛ/; if

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *swét / *swéd, ablative case of *swé (whence se, suus); and originally the same as the inseparable preposition sē- (properly, “by itself”, “apart”, hence, “but”, “only”, etc.). Confer with the semantics of English "only (that)..." (= "but...").

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

sed

  1. but

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • sed”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • sed”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sed in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed redeat, unde aberravit oratio
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed ad id, unde digressi sumus, revertamur
    • in short; to be brief: ne multa, quid plura? sed quid opus est plura?
    • more of this another time: sed de hoc alias pluribus
    • so much for this subject...; enough has been said on..: atque or sed haec (quidem) hactenus
    • so much for this subject...; enough has been said on..: ac (sed) de ... satis dixi, dictum est
    • but that takes us too far: sed lābor longius
    • but this is not to the point: sed hoc nihil (sane) ad rem
    • but enough: sed manum de tabula!

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

sed

  1. (Early Middle English) Alternative form of sad

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sed

  1. Alternative form of seed (seed)

Northern KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Iranian *catám, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *ćatám, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm. Compare Persian صد(sad), Pashto سل(səl), Avestan 𐬯𐬀𐬙𐬀(sata), Sanskrit शत (śatá), Hindi सौ (sau).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

sed

  1. hundred, 100, C

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *śědъ.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sȇd (definite sȇdī, comparative sediji, Cyrillic spelling се̑д)

  1. grey (usually of hair)
  2. grey-haired

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin sitis (thirst), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis (perishing, decrease). Cognate with Portuguese sede. Doublet of tisis.

NounEdit

sed f (plural sedes)

  1. thirst
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sed

  1. second-person plural imperative of ser

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish siþer, from Old Norse siðr, from Proto-Germanic *siduz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sed c

  1. a (society-wide) custom, a traditional habit

DeclensionEdit

Declension of sed 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sed seden seder sederna
Genitive seds sedens seders sedernas

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ZazakiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Persian صد(sad).

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NumeralEdit

sed

  1. hundred