sed

See also: seď, šed, šeď, șed, and SED

Contents

EnglishEdit

English Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia en

EtymologyEdit

From stream editor.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

sed

  1. (computing) A noninteractive text editor (originally developed in Unix), intended for making systematic edits in an automatic or batch-oriented way.

VerbEdit

sed ‎(third-person singular simple present seds, present participle sedding, simple past and past participle sedded)

  1. (neologism, slang) To edit a file or stream of text using sed.
    Can you sed out those trailing spaces, please?

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sed

ConjunctionEdit

sed

  1. but

KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Iranian, from Proto-Indo-Iranian *ćata, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm. Compare Persian صد ‎(sad), Pashto سل ‎(səl), Avestan 𐬯𐬀𐬙𐬀 ‎(sata), Sanskrit शत ‎(śatá), Hindi सौ ‎(sau).

NumeralEdit

sed

  1. (cardinal) hundred, 100, C

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perhaps from the old, original form sedum, but more probably an ablative form from the root (so- for suo-) of the reflexive pronoun suus, and originally the same as the inseparable preposition sēd; properly, “by itself”, “apart”, hence, “but”, “only”, etc.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

sed

  1. but

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • sed” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
  • sed” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed redeat, unde aberravit oratio
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed ad id, unde digressi sumus, revertamur
    • in short; to be brief: ne multa, quid plura? sed quid opus est plura?
    • more of this another time: sed de hoc alias pluribus
    • so much for this subject...; enough has been said on..: atque or sed haec (quidem) hactenus
    • so much for this subject...; enough has been said on..: ac (sed) de ... satis dixi, dictum est
    • but that takes us too far: sed lābor longius
    • but this is not to the point: sed hoc nihil (sane) ad rem
    • but enough: sed manum de tabula!

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

sed

  1. rafsi of stedu.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *sědъ.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sȇd ‎(definite sȇdī, comparative sediji, Cyrillic spelling се̑д)

  1. grey (usually of hair)
  2. grey-haired

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin sitis ‎(thirst), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis ‎(perishing, decrease). Cognate with Portuguese sede.

NounEdit

sed f ‎(plural sedes)

  1. thirst
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sed

  1. Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of ser.

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish siþer, from Old Norse siðr, from Proto-Germanic *siduz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sed c

  1. a (society-wide) custom, a traditional habit

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of sed 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sed seden seder sederna
Genitive seds sedens seders sedernas

Related termsEdit

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