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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French rétro, ultimately from Latin retro.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

retro (comparative more retro, superlative most retro)

  1. Of, or relating to, the past, past times, or the way things were.
    • 2014 September 7, Natalie Angier, “The Moon comes around again [print version: Revisiting a moon that still has secrets to reveal: Supermoon revives interest in its violent origins and hidden face, International New York Times, 10 September 2014, p. 8]”, in The New York Times[1]:
      Scientists say that while the public may think of the moon as a problem solved and a bit retro – the place astronauts visited a half-dozen times way back before Watergate and then abandoned with a giant "meh" from mankind – in fact, lunar studies is a vibrant enterprise that is yielding a wealth of surprises.
  2. Affecting things past; retroactive, ex post facto.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

retro (countable and uncountable, plural retros or retroes)

  1. (uncountable) Past fashions or trends.
  2. (countable) Abbreviation of retrorocket.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


InterlinguaEdit

AdverbEdit

retro (not comparable)

  1. back

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin retro.

AdverbEdit

retro

  1. behind

NounEdit

retro m (invariable)

  1. back, rear, reverse

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From re- + *-trō, probably taken from intrō and other similar adverbs.

AdverbEdit

retrō (not comparable)

  1. back, backwards, behind
  2. before, formerly

DescendantsEdit

  • Galician: redor
  • Portuguese: redor
  • Spanish: redor

ReferencesEdit


NovialEdit

AdverbEdit

retro

  1. backwards
  2. back

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin retro.

AdjectiveEdit

retro (plural retros)

  1. retro