serpent

See also: Serpent and sèrpent

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English serpent, from Old French serpent (snake, serpent), from Latin serpēns (snake), present active participle of serpere (to creep, crawl), from Proto-Italic *serpō, from Proto-Indo-European *serp-. In this sense, displaced native Old English nǣdre (snake, serpent), whence Modern English adder.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serpent (plural serpents)

  1. (now literary) A snake, especially a large or dangerous one.
  2. (figuratively) A subtle, treacherous, malicious person.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      At last it came. `Dogs and serpents,' She began in a low voice that gradually gathered power as she went on, till the place rang with it. Eaters of human flesh, two things have ye done. First, ye have attacked these strangers, being white men, and would have slain their servant, and for that alone death is your reward.'
  3. (music) An obsolete wind instrument in the brass family, whose shape is suggestive of a snake (Wikipedia article).
  4. A kind of firework with a serpentine motion.

SynonymsEdit

Terms derived from Germanic roots
Terms derived from Latin

HyponymsEdit

Of the sense “a snake”
Of the sense “a firework”

MeronymsEdit

Of the sense “a snake”

HolonymsEdit

Of the sense “a snake”

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from “serpent”
Attributive uses of the noun “serpent”

Related termsEdit

Terms derived from Latin “serpēns

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

serpent (third-person singular simple present serpents, present participle serpenting, simple past and past participle serpented)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To wind or meander
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To encircle.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin serpēns, serpentem, from serpō (crawl, creep).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serpent m or f (plural serpents)

  1. snake

SynonymsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch serpent, from Old French serpent (snake, serpent), from Latin serpēns (snake), from the verb serpō (I creep, crawl).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serpent n or f or m (plural serpenten, diminutive serpentje n)

  1. (formal, dated) snake
    Synonym: slang
  2. (formal) serpent, serpentine dragon, large snake
    Synonym: slang
  3. an unpleasant, spiteful or foulmouthed person, especially used of women
    Synonym: slang

NounEdit

serpent f (plural serpenten, diminutive serpentje n)

  1. (music) serpent (wind instrument)

DescendantsEdit

  • West Frisian: serpint

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French serpent, from Old French serpent, from Latin serpentem, accusative form of serpēns, from serpō (crawl, creep).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serpent m (plural serpents, feminine serpente)

  1. snake

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

serpent

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of serpō

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French serpent, from Latin serpentem, accusative singular form of serpēns.

NounEdit

serpent m (plural serpenz)

  1. snake

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin serpēns, serpentem.

NounEdit

serpent m (oblique plural serpenz or serpentz, nominative singular serpenz or serpentz, nominative plural serpent)

  1. snake

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French serpent or English serpent.

NounEdit

serpent n (plural serpente)

  1. (music) serpent

DeclensionEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin serpēns, serpentem.

NounEdit

serpent m (plural serpents)

  1. (Surmiran) snake

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) serp
  • (Sursilvan) siarp
  • (Sutsilvan) zearp
  • (Surmiran) zerp