See also: -had and háð

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hadde (preterite), yhad (past participle), from Old English hæfde (first and third person singular preterite), ġehæfd (past participle), from Proto-Germanic *habd-, past and past participle stem of *habjaną (to have), equivalent to have +‎ -ed. Cognate with Dutch had, German hatte, Swedish hade, Icelandic hafði.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hæd/
  • (had to): IPA(key): /hæt/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /həd/, /əd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æd

VerbEdit

had

  1. Simple past tense and past participle of have.
    This morning I had an egg for breakfast.
    A good time was had by all.
  2. (auxiliary, followed by a past participle) Used to form the past perfect tense, expressing an action that took place prior to a reference point that is itself in the past.
    I felt sure that I had seen him before.
    • 2011 April 15, Ben Cooper, The Guardian, London:
      Cooper seems an odd choice, but imagine if they had taken MTV's advice and chosen Robert Pattinson?
  3. (auxiliary, now rare) As past subjunctive: would have.
    • 1499, John Skelton, The Bowge of Courte:
      To holde myne honde, by God, I had grete payne; / For forthwyth there I had him slayne, / But that I drede mordre wolde come oute [].
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 4, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      Julius Cæsar had escaped death, if going to the Senate-house, that day wherein he was murthered by the Conspirators, he had read a memorial which was presented unto him.
    • 1849, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, In Memoriam, 24:
      If all was good and fair we met, / This earth had been the Paradise / It never look’d to human eyes / Since our first Sun arose and set.

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Had, like that, is one of a small number of words to be correctly used twice in succession in English in a non-contrived way, e.g. “He had had several operations previously.”

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

VerbEdit

had

  1. preterite of ; had

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *satos, from *sh₁-tó-, past participle of Proto-Indo-European *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with English seed.

NounEdit

had m (plural hadoù)

  1. (botany) seed

Central Cagayan AgtaEdit

PronounEdit

had

  1. (interrogative) where

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Old Czech had, from Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

had m anim

  1. snake

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • had in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • had in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz, from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂d- (hate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

had n (singular definite hadet, not used in plural form)

  1. hate, hatred

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

had

  1. imperative of hade

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

had

  1. singular past indicative of hebben

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Hungarian hodu, from Proto-Ugric *kontə, from Proto-Finno-Ugric *kunta.[1] Cognate with Finnish kunta.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

had (plural hadak)

  1. (military) army

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -a-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative had hadak
accusative hadat hadakat
dative hadnak hadaknak
instrumental haddal hadakkal
causal-final hadért hadakért
translative haddá hadakká
terminative hadig hadakig
essive-formal hadként hadakként
essive-modal
inessive hadban hadakban
superessive hadon hadakon
adessive hadnál hadaknál
illative hadba hadakba
sublative hadra hadakra
allative hadhoz hadakhoz
elative hadból hadakból
delative hadról hadakról
ablative hadtól hadaktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
hadé hadaké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
hadéi hadakéi
Possessive forms of had
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hadam hadaim
2nd person sing. hadad hadaid
3rd person sing. hada hadai
1st person plural hadunk hadaink
2nd person plural hadatok hadaitok
3rd person plural haduk hadaik

Derived termsEdit

Compound words

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Róna-Tas, András; Berta, Árpád; Károly, László (2011) West Old Turkic: Turkic Loanwords in Hungarian (Turcologica; 84), volume II, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, page 1277

Further readingEdit

  • had in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Jersey DutchEdit

VerbEdit

had

  1. had
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      En kääd'l had twî jongers; []
      A man had two sons. []

MatalEdit

VerbEdit

had

  1. to walk, go
    Kamkam, kahad à Urusalima aw! (Sləray 21:21)[1]
    Don't go to Jerusalem! (Acts 21:12)

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

had

  1. Alternative form of hod

Old CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

NounEdit

had m

  1. snake

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Czech: had

Further readingEdit

  • had”, in Vokabulář webový: webové hnízdo pramenů k poznání historické češtiny [online][1], Praha: Ústav pro jazyk český AV ČR, 2006–2020

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *haiduz (state, condition, rank, person). Akin to Old Norse heiðr (dignity, honor), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌳𐌿𐍃 (haidus, manner).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hād m (nominative plural hādas)

  1. person, individual
  2. a character
    • c. 1011, Byrhtferth, Manual
      Þonne se sċop inn ġebringþ ōðre hādas þe wiþ hine wordliġen swelċe hīe him andswariġen, þonne biþ sēo ġesetnes "ġemǣne" oþþe "ġemenġed" ġeċīeġed.
      When the poet introduces other characters who talk to him as if they're answering him, the composition is called "common" or "mixed."
  3. individuality
  4. rank, status
  5. a person of the Trinity
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "Of the Catholic Faith"
      Nis se Fæder āna Þrīnes, oþþe se Sunu Þrīnes, oþþe se Hālga Gāst Þrīnes, ac þās þrī hādas sind ān god on ānre godcundnesse.
      The Trinity is not the Father alone, or the Son, or the Holy Spirit; these three persons are one god in one godhead.
  6. honor, dignity
  7. office (esp religious)
  8. state, condition; nature, manner
  9. gender
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "On the Nativity of the Holy Virgins"
      Sēo ġelaðung is ġegaderod of ǣġðres hādes mannum, þæt is, werhādes and wīfhādes.
      The church is gathered from people of each gender, that is, the male sex and the female sex.
  10. (grammar) grammatical person
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Excerptiones de Arte Grammatica Anglice
      Þrī hādas sind worda. Se forma hād is þe spricþ be him selfum ānum ("iċ seċġe", oþþe mid ōðrum mannum on maniġfealdum ġetæle, "wē seċġaþ"). Se ōðer hād is þe se forma spricþ tō ("þū sæġst", oþþe maniġfealdlīċe "ġē seċġaþ"). Se þridda hād is be þǣm þe se forma hād spricþ tō þǣm ōðrum hāde ("hē sæġþ", oþþe maniġfealdlīċe "hīe seċġaþ").
      Verbs have three persons. The first person talks about himself alone ("I say", or with other people in the plural, "we say"). The second person is whoever the first person talks to ("you say", or in the plural "y'all say"). The third person is whoever the first person talks about to the second person ("he says", or in the plural "they say").
  11. race; kindred, family; tribe, group
  12. choir

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SlovakEdit

 
Slovak Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sk

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

had m (genitive singular hada, nominative plural hady, genitive plural hadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. snake, serpent

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • had in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

SumerianEdit

RomanizationEdit

had

  1. Romanization of 𒉺 (ḫad)

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish حد(hadd), from Arabic حَدّ(ḥadd).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

had (definite accusative haddi, plural hadler)

  1. limit
  2. boundary

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative had
Definite accusative haddi
Singular Plural
Nominative had hadler
Definite accusative haddi hadleri
Dative hadde hadlere
Locative hadde hadlerde
Ablative hadden hadlerden
Genitive haddin hadlerin

Upper SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *gadъ.

NounEdit

had m

  1. snake, serpent

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh hat, from Proto-Brythonic *had, from Proto-Celtic *satos, from Proto-Indo-European *sh₁-tó-, past participle of *seh₁- (to sow). Cognate with English seed.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

had m pl or m sg (singulative hedyn, plural hadau)

  1. seed, seeds (collectively)
  2. semen, sperm

Related termsEdit