See also: Ally and -ally

EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for ally in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English allien, alien, from Old French alier (Modern Old French allier), from Latin alligō (to bind to), from ad (to) + ligō (to bind). Compare alligate, allay, alloy and ligament.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ăl'ī, IPA(key): /ˈæl.aɪ/ (noun, also used for the verb)[1]
    • (file)
  • enPR: əlī', IPA(key): /əˈlaɪ/ (verb, sometimes used for the noun)[2]
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

VerbEdit

ally (third-person singular simple present allies, present participle allying, simple past and past participle allied)

  1. (transitive) To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy.
  2. (transitive) To connect or form a relation between by similitude, resemblance, friendship, or love.
Usage notesEdit
  • Generally used in the passive form or reflexively.
  • Often followed by to or with.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

ally (plural allies)

  1. A person, group, or state (etc) which is associated with another for a common cause; one united to another by treaty or common purpose; a confederate.
    the two countries were allies in WWI
  2. A person, group, concept (etc) which is associated with another as a helper; a supporter; an auxiliary.
    • 1857, Henry Thomas Buckle, History of Civilization in England:
      Science, instead of being the enemy of religion, becomes its ally.
    1. A person who is not a member of the LGBT+ community but is supportive of it.
    2. An outside supporter of any demographic subject to discrimination and/or misrepresentation.
      I'm glad you want to be a better ally to the disabled.
  3. Anything akin to something else by structure, etc.
  4. (taxonomy) A closely related species, usually within the same family.
    Gruiformes — cranes and allies
  5. (obsolete) A relative; a kinsman.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ ally” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ ally” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Etymology 2Edit

Diminutive of alabaster.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ally (plural allies)

  1. Alternative form of alley (a glass marble or taw)

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit