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EnglishEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for ally in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English allien, alien, from Old French alier (Modern Old French allier), from Latin alligō (to bind to), from ad (to) + ligō (to bind). Compare alligate, allay, alloy and ligament.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ăl'ī, IPA(key): /ˈæl.aɪ/ (noun, also used for the verb)[1]
  • enPR: əlī', IPA(key): /əˈlaɪ/ (verb, sometimes used for the noun)[2]
  • Rhymes: -aɪ

VerbEdit

ally (third-person singular simple present allies, present participle allying, simple past and past participle allied)

  1. (transitive) To unite, or form a connection between, as between families by marriage, or between princes and states by treaty, league, or confederacy
  2. (transitive) To connect or form a relation between by similitude, resemblance, friendship, or love.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser:
      These three did love each other dearly well, And with so firm affection were allied.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope:
      The virtue nearest to our vice allied.
Usage notesEdit
  • Generally used in the passive form or reflexively.
  • Often followed by to or with.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

ally (plural allies)

  1. One united to another by treaty or league; — usually applied to sovereigns or states; a confederate.
    • 2019 May 5, Danette Chavez, “Campaigns are waged on and off the Game Of Thrones battlefield (newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1]:
      Even before she begs Jon to keep his identity a secret, she reeks of desperation; in order to gain an ally that isn’t already in her entourage, she sets Gendry Baratheon né Rivers up in Storm’s End.
    • (Can we date this quote by Thomas Babington Macaulay and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the English soldiers and their French allies
  2. Anything associated with another as a helper; an auxiliary.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Buckle:
      Science, instead of being the enemy of religion, becomes its ally.
  3. Anything akin to something else by structure, etc.
  4. (taxonomy) A closely related species, usually within the same family.
    Gruiformes — cranes and allies
  5. (specifically) A person who is not a member of the LGBT+ community but is supportive of it.
  6. (obsolete) A relative; a kinsman.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ ally” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. ^ ally” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Etymology 2Edit

Diminutive of alabaster.

NounEdit

ally (plural allies)

  1. Alternative form of alley (a glass marble or taw)

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit