See also: sönder and sonder-

English edit

Etymology edit

Coined by American author and neologist John Koenig in 2012, whose project, The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows, aims to come up with new words for emotions that currently lack words.[1][2] Inspired by German sonder- (special) and French sonder (to probe).[3]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sonder (uncountable)

  1. (neologism) The profound feeling of realizing that everyone, including strangers passing in the street, has a life as complex as one's own, which they are constantly living despite one's personal lack of awareness of it.
    • 2012 December, John Buysse, “On 2nd thought, we do have linked lives”, in The Daily Illini, volume 142, number 68,5, University of Illinois, page 4A:
      I had a sonder, a realization that the random girl sitting next to me inside of Starbucks might have a fantastic life or she might be dealing with a very ill family member.
    • 2013, Annie Cohen, "A Deeper Understanding", Panorama (Ladue Horton Watkins High School, St. Louis, Missouri), Volume 62, Issue 3, 14 October 2013, page 14:
      We need to have a "sonder" moment, where we realize that we aren't the only ones with feelings, dreams, regrets and hopes.
    • 2015, Emily Neiman, Sonder: Clara's Story[1], iUniverse, →ISBN:
      I knew the feeling of sonder my whole life. [] Every time I stopped what I was doing and just watched people, this feeling of breathlessness would wash over me.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:sonder.

References edit

  1. ^ Maggie Powers, "Searching for a word in Kenmore", The Heights (Boston College), Volume 95, Number 44, 13 November 2014, page B7
  2. ^ "sonder", The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows
  3. ^ "sonder", The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows Official Facebook

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch zonder, from Middle Dutch sonder, from Old Dutch sunder, from Proto-Germanic *sundraz. Cognate with English sunder.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɔn.dər/
  • (file)

Preposition edit

sonder

  1. without

Danish edit

Noun edit

sonder c pl

  1. plural indefinite of sonde

Verb edit

sonder or sondér

  1. imperative of sondere

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French sonder, from Old French sonder (to plumb), from sonde (sounding line), from Old English sund- (sounding), as in sundġierd (sounding-rod), sundlīne (sounding-line, lead), sundrāp (sounding-rope, lead), from sund (ocean, sea), from Proto-Germanic *sundą (a swim, body of water, sound), from Proto-Indo-European *swem(bʰ)- (to be unsteady, swim). Cognate with Old Norse sund (swimming; strait, sound). More at sound.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

sonder

  1. (transitive) to probe (test with a probe)
  2. (transitive) to probe (test the depth of something)
    1. to sound (use sound waves to establish the depth)
  3. (transitive) to probe (look carefully around)
  4. (transitive) to probe (ask someone many questions, in order to find something out)
  5. (meteorology) to survey and take measurements using a weather balloon
  6. to survey (carry out a survey or poll)
  7. (intransitive) to dive down

Conjugation edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • German: sondieren
    • Russian: зонди́ровать (zondírovatʹ)

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

German edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *sundraz (isolated, particular, alone), from Proto-Indo-European *snter-, *seni-, *senu-, *san- (apart, without, for oneself). Cognate to Latin sine (without), English sunder (separate, different).

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

sonder (governs the accusative)

  1. (archaic) without; except; not including
    Synonyms: außer, exklusive, ohne

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • sonder” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • sonder” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon

Malay edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch zonder, from Middle Dutch sonder, from Old Dutch sunder, from Proto-Germanic *sundraz.

Preposition edit

sonder (Jawi spellingسوندر⁩)

  1. (Netherlands, Indonesia) without (not having)

Synonyms edit

Middle Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Old Dutch sunder, from Proto-Germanic *sundraz.

Preposition edit

sonder [+accusative]

  1. without
  2. except (for)

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French sonder, from sonde (sounding line), from Old English [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *sundą (a swim, body of water, sound), from Proto-Indo-European *swem(bh)- (to be unsteady, swim).

Verb edit

sonder

  1. (Jersey) to sound

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Noun edit

sonder m pl

  1. indefinite plural of sonde

Swedish edit

Noun edit

sonder

  1. indefinite plural of sond