See also: Probe, probé, and próbę

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

For verb: borrowed from Latin probare (to test, examine, prove), from probus (good).

For noun: borrowed from Late Latin proba (a proof), from probare (to test, examine, prove); Doublet of proof. Compare Spanish tienta (a surgeon's probe), from tentar (try, test); see tempt.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹəʊb/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /pɹoʊb/
  • Rhymes: -əʊb

NounEdit

probe (plural probes)

  1. (surgery) Any of various medical instruments used to explore wounds, organs, etc. [from 15th c.]
  2. (figuratively) Something which penetrates something else, as though to explore; something which obtains information. [from 17th c.]
  3. An act of probing; a prod, a poke. [from 19th c.]
  4. (figuratively) An investigation or inquiry. [from 20th c.]
    They launched a probe into the cause of the accident.
  5. (aeronautics) A tube attached to an aircraft which can be fitted into the drogue from a tanker aircraft to allow for aerial refuelling. [from 20th c.]
  6. (sciences) A small device, especially an electrode, used to explore, investigate or measure something by penetrating or being placed in it. [from 20th c.]
    Insert the probe into the soil and read the temperature.
  7. (astronautics) A small, usually unmanned, spacecraft used to acquire information or measurements about its surroundings. [from 20th c.]
  8. (game of Go) a move with multiple answers seeking to make the opponent choose and commit to a strategy
  9. (biochemistry) Any group of atoms or molecules radioactively labeled in order to study a given molecule or other structure

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

probe (third-person singular simple present probes, present participle probing, simple past and past participle probed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To explore, investigate, or question
    If you probe further, you may discover different reasons.
    • 1827, Henry Hallam, The Constitutional History of England
      the growing disposition to probe the legality of all acts of the crown
  2. (transitive) To insert a probe into.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

probe

  1. inflection of proben:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

probe

  1. feminine plural of probo

LatinEdit

AdverbEdit

probē (comparative probius, superlative probissimē)

  1. well, rightly, properly, correctly, fitly, opportunely, excellently

AdjectiveEdit

probe

  1. vocative masculine singular of probus

ReferencesEdit

  • probe in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • probe in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • probe in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

probe (plural probes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pobre