sine

See also: Sine, Síne, Sìne, and sìne

Contents

EnglishEdit

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Sine function

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sinus, translation of Arabic جَيْب ‎(jayb).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sine ‎(plural sines)

  1. (trigonometry, mathematics) In a right triangle, the ratio of the length of the side opposite an angle to the length of the hypotenuse.

Usage notesEdit

In various branches of mathematics, the sine of an angle is determined in various ways, including the following:

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /siːnə/, [ˈsiːnə], [ˌsiːnə]

PronounEdit

sine

  1. plural of sin

See alsoEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish sine, siniu, comparative form of sen ‎(old).

AdjectiveEdit

sine

  1. comparative degree of sean: older

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish sine ‎(teat, dug, pap), from Proto-Celtic *sɸenyo-, from Proto-Indo-European *pstḗn. Cognate with Old Norse speni ‎(teat), English spean ‎(teat (of a cow)).

NounEdit

sine f ‎(genitive singular sine, nominative plural siní)

  1. nipple
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sine shine
after "an", tsine
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • "sine" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 sine” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 3 sine” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PrepositionEdit

sine

  1. (with ablative) without
    Sum sine regno.
    I am without a kingdom.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • sine” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

sine

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of sinō

NeapolitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsinɛ/, /ˈsinɐ/

ParticleEdit

sine

  1. yes

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sínir.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

sine pl

  1. plural of sin

ReferencesEdit

  • “sin” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sínir.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

sine pl

  1. plural of sin

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

sine m ‎(oblique plural sines, nominative singular sines, nominative plural sine)

  1. Alternative form of cisne

NounEdit

sine m ‎(oblique plural sines, nominative singular sines, nominative plural sine)

  1. Alternative form of signe

RomanianEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin , as with mine, tine.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

sine ‎(stressed reflexive-accusative form of el, ea, ei, and ele)

  1. (direct object, preceded by preposition, such as "pe", "cu", "la", or "pentru") himself, herself, itself, themselves

SynonymsEdit

  • se (unstressed form)

Scottish GaelicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish sine ‎(teat, dug, pap), from Proto-Celtic *sɸenyo-, from Proto-Indo-European *pstḗn. Cognate with Old Norse speni ‎(teat), English spean ‎(teat (of a cow)).

NounEdit

sine f ‎(genitive singular sine, plural sinean)

  1. (anatomy) nipple, teat

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from English gin.

NounEdit

sine f

  1. gin (drink)

Etymology 3Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

AdjectiveEdit

sine

  1. comparative degree of sean
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