See also: calçar

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the Italian calcara (lime-kiln).

NounEdit

calcar (plural calcars)

  1. A small oven or furnace, used for the calcination of sand and potash, and converting them into frit.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From the Latin calcar (spur).

NounEdit

calcar (plural calcars)

  1. (botany, anatomy) A spur-like projection.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

VerbEdit

calcar (first-person singular indicative present calco, past participle calcáu)

  1. to press, push
  2. to hit, strike

ConjugationEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin calcāre (to press), present active infinitive of calcō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

calcar (first-person singular present calco, first-person singular preterite calquei, past participle calcado)

  1. to press
  2. to trample

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • calc” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • calcar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • calcar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • calcar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from an extension of the Proto-Indo-European *(s)kel- (heel). Cognate of calx, calcō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

calcar n (genitive calcāris); third declension

  1. spur (equestrian, or of a cock)
  2. (figuratively) incitement, stimulus

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, “pure” i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative calcar calcāria
Genitive calcāris calcārium
Dative calcārī calcāribus
Accusative calcar calcāria
Ablative calcārī calcāribus
Vocative calcar calcāria

DescendantsEdit

  • English: calcar

ReferencesEdit

  • calcar in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • calcar in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • calcar in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to put spurs to a horse: calcaribus equum concitare
  • calcar in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • calcar in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • New Latin Grammar, Allen and Greenough, 1903.

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

calcar (first-person singular present indicative calco, past participle calcado)

  1. to trample, to crush
  2. to press (grapes, etc.)
  3. (figuratively) to humiliate, to subjugate
  4. (transitive) to base a work on (a previous one)
  5. (transitive) to copy a work

Usage notesEdit

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

calcar m (plural calcares)

  1. (botany) spur
  2. (zoology) in arthropods, a mobile process similar to a spike
  3. (zoology) in certain insects, the strongest spur located in the tibia

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French calcaire, from Latin calcarius.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kalˈkar/, /ˈkal.kar/

NounEdit

calcar n (plural calcare)

  1. limestone
    Synonym: piatră-de-var

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin calcāre, present active infinitive of calcō.

VerbEdit

calcar (first-person singular present calco, first-person singular preterite calqué, past participle calcado)

  1. to trace, copy (copy by means of carbon paper or tracing paper)
  2. to trample
ConjugationEdit
  • c becomes qu before e.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

calcar m (plural calcares)

  1. (anatomy, botany) calcar (a spur-like projection)
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit