See also: TEI, Téi, tēi, and tʼéí

Brooke's Point Palawano edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *taqi, from Proto-Austronesian *Caqi. Compare Indonesian tahi, Malagasy tay, Palauan dach and Samoan tae.

Noun edit

tei

  1. feces; manure

Chang edit

Noun edit

tei

  1. water

References edit

  • Walter Thomas French, Northern Naga: A Tibeto-Burman Mesolanguage, volume 2 (1983), page 567: Ph yuŋ le, Ch tei la 'thirsty' (Ph yuŋ/Ch tei = 'water')

Fala edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese tou, from Latin tuus.

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

tei m sg (feminine túa, masculine plural teis, feminine plural túas)

  1. Second-person singular possessive determiner; your

Pronoun edit

tei m sg (feminine túa, masculine plural teis, feminine plural túas)

  1. Second-person singular possessive pronoun; yours

See also edit

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[1], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin tilia, changed into a masculine. Compare Italian tiglio, Romanian tei, Catalan tell.

Noun edit

tei m

  1. lime tree, linden

Ido edit

Noun edit

tei

  1. plural of teo

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

tei

  1. Rōmaji transcription of てい

Latgalian edit

Etymology edit

Akin to Latvian tie and Lithuanian tie.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈtʲɛ̀i̯]
  • Hyphenation: tei

Pronoun edit

tei

  1. that (feminine)

Declension edit

See also edit

References edit

  • Nicole Nau (2011) A short grammar of Latgalian, München: LINCOM GmbH, →ISBN, page 37

Livonian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *täi.

Noun edit

tei

  1. louse

Declension edit

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

tei

  1. Nonstandard spelling of tēi.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

tei

  1. Alternative form of teye (cord, chain)

Etymology 2 edit

Pronoun edit

tei

  1. Alternative form of þei (they)

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

tei

  1. imperative of teia

Obokuitai edit

Noun edit

tei

  1. child

Further reading edit

Old French edit

Pronoun edit

tei

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of toi

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin tilia, turned masculine in assimilation to other tree names, or through Vulgar Latin *tilius. Compare Italian tiglio and Friulian tei.

Noun edit

tei m (plural tei)

  1. linden tree

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Samoan edit

Noun edit

tei

  1. younger relative

Scots edit

Noun edit

tei (plural teis)

  1. (South Scots) tea

Tobati edit

Numeral edit

tei

  1. one

References edit

  • Mark Donohue, Tobati, in John Lynch, Malcolm Ross, Terry Crowley, The Oceanic Languages (Curzon Press, Londres, 2002)

Tolomako edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Oceanic *bei.

Noun edit

tei

  1. water

References edit

  • Darrell T. Tryon, New Hebrides languages: an internal classification (1976), page 311

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Borrowing from English tie.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tei m or f (plural teis)

  1. necktie

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tei dei nhei thei
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.