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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Made up to sound like a Greek letter.

NounEdit

vanna (uncountable)

  1. (finance) A second-order measure of derivative price sensitivity, expressed as the rate of change of vega with respect to changes in the spot price, or equivalently the rate of change of delta with respect to changes in the volatility of the underlying asset.

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

  • (measure of derivative price sensitivity): Greeks (includes list of coordinate terms)

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian ва́нна (vánna), from German Wanne, from Old High German wanna, from Latin vannus.

NounEdit

vanna

  1. (dialectal) bathtub
  2. melter of a glass furnace

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of vanna (Kotus type 9/kala, no gradation)
nominative vanna vannat
genitive vannan vannojen
partitive vannaa vannoja
illative vannaan vannoihin
singular plural
nominative vanna vannat
accusative nom. vanna vannat
gen. vannan
genitive vannan vannojen
vannainrare
partitive vannaa vannoja
inessive vannassa vannoissa
elative vannasta vannoista
illative vannaan vannoihin
adessive vannalla vannoilla
ablative vannalta vannoilta
allative vannalle vannoille
essive vannana vannoina
translative vannaksi vannoiksi
instructive vannoin
abessive vannatta vannoitta
comitative vannoineen

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

vanna

  1. third-person singular past historic of vanner

IngrianEdit

NounEdit

vanna

  1. bathtub

LatvianEdit

 
Vanna (1)
 
Saules vanna (3)

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle Low German wanne or Swedish vanna (cf. German Wanne), itself a borrowing from Latin vannus (winnowing basket). Such baskets were originally long and round; bathtubs were named after them due to the resemblance in form. The term is first mentioned in Latvian in 17th- and 18th-century dictionaries.[1]

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

vanna f (4th declension)

  1. bathtub, tub (large container for water in which a person may bathe or wash something)
    skārda vannatin bathtub
    ielaist vannā ūdenito let the water into the bathtub
    iekāpt vannāto get into the bathtub
    veļas mazgājamā vannaa (large) tub for washing clothes
    nesteidzoties atgriežu krānus, un vannā ar lielu troksni ieplūst silts ūdensunhurriedly I open the tap, and the cold water flows noisily into the bathtub
  2. (technology) tub (a container for a certain material in liquid form to be worked on)
    elektrolītiska vannaelectrolytic tub
  3. bath (the act of bathing in a bathtub, especially for medicinal or therapeutic purposes)
    karsta vannahot bath
    skuju ekstrakta vannapine extract bath
    dūņu vannasmud baths
    iet vannāto go (have a) bath
    pirms gulētiešanas vēlama silta vanna, kas nomierina nervu sistēmu un uzlabo miegubefore going to bed, it is desirable (to take) a cold bath, which relaxes the nervous system and improves sleep
    es ņemu ogļskābes vannas, lai drusku atpūtinātu savus nervusI take carbonic acid baths in order to rest my nerves a little
  4. bath (prolonged exposure of one's naked body or body part(s) to some medium, generally sun or air)
    es pēc brokastīm izģērbjos un uzkāpju uz komandtiltiņa ņemt saules vannasafter breakfast, I take off my clothes and go up to the bridge (of the boat) to take a sun bath
    atpūtas korpusa jumta plakni sanatorijā varēs izmantot saules un gaisa vannāmthe roof of the recreation building can be used for sun and air baths

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “vanna”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

vanna

  1. inflection of vanne:
    1. simple past
    2. past participle