See also: Wak and WAK

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

wak

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-5 language code for Wakashan languages.

Afar edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈwak/, [ˈwʌʰk]
  • Hyphenation: wak

Adverb edit

wák

  1. sometimes

Noun edit

wák m 

  1. time, instance

Declension edit

Declension of wák
absolutive wák
predicative wáka
subjective wák
genitive waktí
Postpositioned forms
l-case wákal
k-case wákak
t-case wákat
h-case wákah

Synonyms edit

  • (time, instance): wáy

References edit

  • E. M. Parker, R. J. Hayward (1985) “wak”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2004) Parlons Afar: Langue et Culture, L'Hammartan, →ISBN, page 37

Amanab edit

Noun edit

wak

  1. reed

Atong (India) edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bodo-Garo *bwak, from Proto-Tibeto-Burman *pwak, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *pʷak.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

wak (Bengali script ৱাক)

  1. pig
  2. pork

References edit

Choctaw edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish vaca. Cognate with Chickasaw waaka'.

Noun edit

wak

  1. cow

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch wac. Related to wake, from Old Dutch *waka, from Proto-Germanic *wakwō. Probably not identical to this form, however, as both the gender and formation are different: wake and its cognates are feminine ō-stems, while wac is a neuter a-stem. It would therefore have to derive from Proto-Germanic *wakwą, but this form has no other known descendants.

Cognate with Middle Low German wake (German Wake), Old Norse vǫk (Icelandic vök, Swedish vak).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ʋɑk/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: wak
  • Rhymes: -ɑk

Noun edit

wak n (plural wakken, diminutive wakje n)

  1. A hole in ice (on the surface of a body of water)

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Epigraphic Mayan edit

Numeral edit

wak

  1. six

Garo edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bodo-Garo *bwak, from Proto-Tibeto-Burman *pwak, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *pʷak.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

wak[1]

  1. pig, swine[2]

References edit

  1. ^ Benedict, Paul K. (1972) Sino-Tibetan: A Conspectus[1], London: Cambridge University Press, page 23
  2. ^ Ramkhe, M. (1887) “শূকর”, in Bengali-Garo Dictionary[2], Tura, Assam: The Garo Mission, page 763

Ilocano edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *waak (crow, raven).

Pronunciation edit

  • (dialectal) IPA(key): /ʔuˈwak/, [ʔuˈwak]

Noun edit

wak (Kur-itan spelling ᜏᜃ᜔)

  1. crow

Derived terms edit

Papiamentu edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch waken in the meaning of "being awake" and "watching over".

Verb edit

wak

  1. to look
  2. to watch
  3. to see

Quechua edit

Adjective edit

wak

  1. distinct, different
  2. unfamiliar

Determiner edit

wak

  1. that, other, another

See also edit

Sarangani Blaan edit

Noun edit

wak

  1. hair

Tocharian A edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Tocharian *wek, from Proto-Indo-European *wṓkʷs. Compare Tocharian B wek.

Noun edit

wak

  1. voice, noise

Yucatec Maya edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Mayan *waqaq-iib'.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

wak

  1. (obsolete) six

References edit

  • Beltrán de Santa Rosa María, Pedro (1746) Arte de el idioma maya reducido a succintas reglas, y semilexicon yucateco (in Spanish), Mexico: Por la Biuda de D. Joseph Bernardo de Hogal, page 152:Uac. Seis. 6.
  • Montgomery, John (2004) Maya-English, English-Maya (Yucatec) Dictionary & Phrasebook, New York: Hippocrene Books, Inc., →ISBN, page 82