See also: Wake

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A merger of two verbs of similar form and meaning:

VerbEdit

wake (third-person singular simple present wakes, present participle waking, simple past woke or waked, past participle woken or waked or (now colloquial) woke)

  1. (intransitive) (often followed by up) To stop sleeping.
    I woke up at four o'clock this morning.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      How long I slept I cannot tell, for I had nothing to guide me to the time, but woke at length, and found myself still in darkness.
  2. (transitive) (often followed by up) To make somebody stop sleeping; to rouse from sleep.
    The neighbour's car alarm woke me from a strange dream.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To put in motion or action; to arouse; to excite.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To be excited or roused up; to be stirred up from a dormant, torpid, or inactive state; to be active.
  5. To watch, or sit up with, at night, as a dead body.
    • 1824, Sir Walter Scott, Redgauntlet:
      Dougal said that being alone with the dead on that floor of the tower (for naebody cared to wake Sir Robert Redgauntlet like another corpse) he had never daured[sic] to answer the call, but that now his conscience checked him for neglecting his duty; []
  6. To be or remain awake; not to sleep.
  7. (obsolete) To be alert; to keep watch
    Command unto the guards that they diligently wake.
  8. (obsolete) To sit up late for festive purposes; to hold a night revel.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

ConjugationEdit

TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

wake (plural wakes)

  1. (obsolete, poetic) The act of waking, or state of being awake.
  2. The state of forbearing sleep, especially for solemn or festive purposes; a vigil.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English wacu, from Proto-Germanic *wakō.

NounEdit

wake (plural wakes)

  1. A period after a person's death before or after the body is buried, cremated, etc.; in some cultures accompanied by a party and/or collectively sorting through the deceased's personal effects.
    • Section 14(1)(a), Infectious Diseases Act (Cap. 137, R. Ed. 2003)
      Where any person has died whilst being, or suspected of being, a case or carrier or contact of an infectious disease, the Director may by order prohibit the conduct of a wake over the body of that person or impose such conditions as he thinks fit on the conduct of such wake []
  2. (historical, Church of England) A yearly parish festival formerly held in commemoration of the dedication of a church. Originally, prayers were said on the evening preceding, and hymns were sung during the night, in the church; subsequently, these vigils were discontinued, and the day itself, often with succeeding days, was occupied in rural pastimes and exercises, attended by eating and drinking.
  3. A number of vultures assembled together.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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Etymology 3Edit

Probably from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch wake, from or akin to Old Norse vǫk (a hole in the ice) ( > Danish våge, Icelandic vök), from Proto-Germanic *wakwō (wetness), from Proto-Indo-European *wegʷ- (moist, wet).

NounEdit

wake (plural wakes)

  1. The path left behind a ship on the surface of the water.
  2. The turbulent air left behind a flying aircraft.
  3. (figuratively) The area behind something, typically a rapidly moving object.
    • 1826, Thomas De Quincey, Lessing (published in Blackwood's Magazine)
      This effect followed immediately in the wake of his earliest exertions.
    • 1857-1859, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Virginians
      Several humbler persons [] formed quite a procession in the dusty wake of his chariot wheels.
    • 2011 September 28, Tom Rostance, “Arsenal 2 - 1 Olympiakos”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Alex Song launched a long ball forward from the back and the winger took it down nicely on his chest. He cut across the penalty area from the right and after one of the three defenders in his wake failed to make a meaningful clearance, the Oxlade-Chamberlain was able to dispatch a low left-footed finish into the far corner.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *waka, from Proto-Germanic *wakō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wake f (plural waken)

  1. A wake (a gathering to remember a dead person).

VerbEdit

wake

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of waken

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

wake

  1. Rōmaji transcription of わけ

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wake

  1. Alternative form of woke

SwahiliEdit

NounEdit

wake

  1. plural of mke

AdjectiveEdit

wake

  1. M class inflected form of -ake.
  2. U class inflected form of -ake.
  3. Wa class inflected form of -ake.

Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Meriam wakey.

NounEdit

wake

  1. (eastern dialect) thigh, upper leg

SynonymsEdit