EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English pork, porc, via Anglo-Norman from Old French porc (swine, hog, pig; pork), from Latin porcus (domestic hog, pig), from Proto-Indo-European *pórḱos (young swine, young pig). Cognate with Old English fearh (young pig, hog). More at farrow.

Used in English since the 14th century, and as a term of abuse since the 17th century.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pork (uncountable)

  1. (uncountable) The meat of a pig; swineflesh.
    The cafeteria serves pork on Tuesdays.
  2. (US, politics, slang, derogatory) Funding proposed or requested by a member of Congress for special interests or his or her constituency as opposed to the good of the country as a whole.

SynonymsEdit

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Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: ポーク (pōku)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

VerbEdit

pork (third-person singular simple present porks, present participle porking, simple past and past participle porked)

  1. (transitive, slang, vulgar, usually of a male) To have sex with (someone).
    Animal House, Universal Pictures, 1978:
    Boon: Marlene! Don't tell me you're gonna pork Marlene Desmond!
    Otter: Pork?
    Boon: You're gonna hump her brains out, aren't you?
    Otter: Boon, I anticipate a deeply religious experience.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ pork” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French porc, from Latin porcus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pork (plural porks)

  1. pork; pig meat
  2. swine, pig

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit