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See also: Wang, wāng, wáng, Wáng, wǎng, and wàng

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wange, from Old English wange (jaw, cheek), from Proto-Germanic *wangô (cheek), from Proto-Indo-European *wenǵ- (neck, cheek). Cognate with Scots wan, wang (cheek), West Frisian wang (cheek), Dutch wang (cheek), German Wange (cheek), Icelandic vanga (cheek), Gothic *𐍅𐌰𐌲𐌲𐍉 (*waggō) in 𐍅𐌰𐌲𐌲𐌰𐍂𐌴𐌹𐍃 (waggareis, pillow, cushion), Italian guancia (cheek).

NounEdit

wang (plural wangs)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Cheek; the jaw.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Onomatopoeia

NounEdit

wang (plural wangs)

  1. (onomatopoeia) The sound made when a hollow metal object is struck a glancing blow.
  2. A slap; a blow.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

VerbEdit

wang (third-person singular simple present wangs, present participle wanging, simple past and past participle wanged)

  1. To batter; to clobber; to conk.
  2. To throw hard.
    • 1993, Tom McNally, “Panfish on Flies and Bugs”, in The Complete Book of Fly Fishing[1], Second Edition edition, McGraw-Hill Professional, published 1997, ISBN 9780070456389, page 283:
      Ask, too, the guy in the bass boat wanging out a spinner-bait at Bull Shoals in Arkansas.
    • 1998, Barry Hines, “The Football Match”, in James Riordan, editor, Football Stories[2], Oxford University Press, published 2004, ISBN 9780192754059, "wanged" page 36:
      He wanged them across the room, and Billy caught them flying over his head, then held them up for inspection as though he was contemplating buying.
    • 2009, Mark Millhone, “Saltville”, in The Patron Saint of Used Cars and Second Chances: A Memoir[3], Rodale, ISBN 9781594868238, "wanged" page 132:
      After Sam filled in my big block letters with the glitter, he unleashed his inner Jackson Pollock, wanging artful paint splatters everywhere.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Origin uncertain. Perhaps short for whangdoodle (gadget, doodad), or from whang (stour, thick slice", also "thong), from thwang (thong). See thong.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wang (plural wangs)

  1. (colloquial) penis.

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch wang.

NounEdit

wang (plural wange)

  1. cheek

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *wanga, from Proto-Germanic *wangô (cheek), from Proto-Indo-European *wenǵ- (neck, cheek).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wang f (plural wangen, diminutive wangetje n)

  1. cheek

MalayEdit

NounEdit

wang (Jawi spelling واڠ)

  1. money
  2. cash

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

wang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of wāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of wáng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of wǎng.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of wàng.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Old Saxon wang, Old High German -wang (in holzwang), Old Norse vangr (Swedish vång), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌲𐌲𐍃 (waggs).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wang m (nominative plural wangas)

  1. (poetic) plain, field, ground
    • 1963, Paull Franklin Baum, Riddle 11, Anglo-Saxon Riddles of the Exeter Book
      sæs me sind ealle flodas on fæðmum / ⁊ þas foldan bearm grene wongas
      All seas and waters are in my embraces, and the bosom of earth and the green fields.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


WoiwurrungEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

wang

  1. cheek

ReferencesEdit

  • Barry J. Blake, Woiwurrung, in The Aboriginal Language of Melbourne and Other Sketches (1991; edited by R. M. W. Dixon and Barry J. Blake; OUP, Handbook of Australian Languages 4), pages 31–124