EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English wrien, from Old English wrīġian (to go, turn, twist, bend, strive, struggle, press forward, endeavor, venture), from Proto-Germanic *wrigōną (to wriggle), from Proto-Indo-European *wreyḱ- (to turn, wrap, tie), from *wer- (to turn, bend). Compare awry, wriggle.

AdjectiveEdit

wry (comparative wrier or wryer, superlative wriest or wryest)

  1. Turned away, contorted (of the face or body).
  2. Dryly humorous; sardonic or bitterly ironic.
    • 1871, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, “chapter 6”, in The Haunted Baronet:
      "[T]he master says a wry word now and then; and so ye let your spirits go down, don't ye see, and all sorts o' fancies comes into your head."
  3. Twisted, bent, crooked.
  4. Deviating from the right direction; misdirected; out of place.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

wry (third-person singular simple present wries, present participle wrying, simple past and past participle wried)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To turn (away); to swerve or deviate.
    • 1535, Thomas More, Dialogue of Comfort Against Tribulation, ch. 18:
      God pricketh them of his great goodness still. And the grief of this great pang pincheth them at the heart, and of wickedness they wry away.
    • 1611 April (first recorded performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Cymbeline”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act V, scene i]:
      You married ones,
      If each of you should take this course, how many
      Must murder wives much better than themselves
      For wrying but a little!
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To divert; to cause to turn away.
  3. (transitive) To twist or contort (the body, face, etc.).
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

wry

  1. (regional) Distortion.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wryen, wrien, wreon, wrihen, from Old English wrēon (to cover, clothe, envelop), from Proto-West Germanic *wrīhan, from Proto-Germanic *wrīhaną (to wrap, cover), from Proto-Indo-European *wreyḱ- (to turn, wrap, tie), from *wer- (to turn, bend).

VerbEdit

wry (third-person singular simple present wries, present participle wrying, simple past and past participle wried)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To cover; clothe; cover up; cloak; hide.