Open main menu
See also: eris, Éris, Erîs, eriş, Eriş, and êrîş

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
 
Eris, tondo of a black-figure kylix, 575-525 BCE

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek Ἔρις (Éris), from ἔρις (éris, strife).

See also   Eris (mythology)#Etymology on Wikipedia.Wikipedia and   Eris (dwarf planet)#Name on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪəɹɨs/, /ˈɛɹɨs/

Proper nounEdit

Eris

  1. (Greek mythology) The goddess of discord and strife, whose apple of discord sparked events that eventually led to the Trojan War; equated by Homer with Enyo (goddess of violent war) and identified with the Roman goddess Discordia;
    (religion, Discordianism) the same figure as principal deity of Discordianism, regarded as the goddess of disorder.
    • 1992, Samuel Ijsseling, Eros and Eris: The Trojan War and Heidegger on the Essence of Truth, Paul van Tongeren, Paul Sars, Chris Bremmers, Koen Boey (editors), Eros and Eris: Contributions to a Hermeneutical Phenomenology Liber Amicorum for Adriaan Peperzak, Kluwer Academic, page 2,
      According to Homer, the Trojan war is, above all, an affair of the gods. It is about Eris, a sister of the god of war Ares, and about Eros, not directly named by Homer, but who in the figure of Aphrodite, the god of love, plays a central role on the side of the Trojans. Eris is the one who divides gods, mortals, and things from each other; Eros is the one who brings them together.
    • 1993, Herman Parret, The Aesthetics of Communication: Pragmatics and Beyond, Springer, Softcover reprint, page 18,
      Eris, "the Strife with the violent heart", one reads in Hesiod's Theogony, is a child of the Night, and "Hateful Struggle gave birth to painful Distress and Distraction and Famine and tearful Sorrow; also Wars and Battles and Murders and Slaughters; also Feuds and Lying Words and Angry Words".
    • 2003, Adam Gorightly, The Prankster and the Conspiracy: The Story of Kerry Thornley and How He Met Oswald and Inspired the Counterculture, Paraview Press, page 58,
      According to Newport, no specific bowling alley can claim to be the site of the birth of the Discordian movement. It evolved at several different bowling alleys. This revelation came as a devastating disappointment to your humble author, who—in the course of writing this book—had planned a grand religious pilgrimage to this envisioned holy site, where I would snap sacred photos of "The Brunswick Shrine," and perhaps even fall to my knees before this fabled Mecca of Discordianism, bowing to the Goddess Eris.
    • 2006, Margot Adler, Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-worshippers, and Other Pagans in America, Penguin, page 351,
      And yet Erisianism should not be treated frivolously. Greg Hill told me his experiences with Eris had been quite profound. Although it started as an atheistic joke, his perceptions began to change.
  2. (astronomy) The plutoid 136199 Eris, the largest found dwarf planet in the Solar System; formerly unofficially known as Xena.
    • 2008, Clément Arsenault, Joseph T. Tennis (editors), Culture and Identity in Knowledge Organization: 10th International ISKO Conference, Proceedings, page 239,
      Pluto turns out to be an object in the Kuiper Belt, but other such objects recently discovered are similar to (such as Santa[136108 Haumea] and Easterbunny[136472 Makemake]) or even larger than Pluto (such as Eris, formerly known as Xena).
    • 2011, Steve Kortenkamp, The Dwarf Planets, Capstone Press, page 24,
      Eris is the largest dwarf planet in the solar system. It is about 1,500 miles (2,400 km) across. Eris is about 6 billion miles (10 billion km) away from the Sun.
    • 2013, Fred Watson, Star-Craving Mad: Tales from a Travelling Astronomer, Allen & Unwin, page 35,
      Today, Xena is no longer Xena but has been officially renamed Eris, after the Greek goddess of strife and discord—which hints at the climate in planetary science at the time. Its moon has a similarly appropriate name, Dysnomia (lawlessness) in Greek mythology, the daughter of Eris. Observations of Eris and Dysnomia have confirmed that Eris is 27 per cent more massive than Pluto, though of a similar diameter.
  3. An unincorporated community in Champaign County, Ohio, United States.

Usage notesEdit

  • (Greek mythology):
  • (Discordian goddess):
    • In Discordian contexts, Eris is sometimes described as the Greek goddess of chaos; strictly speaking, however, this role is attributed to her only within Discordianism, and not in Greek mythology.
  • (dwarf planet):
    • Due to a delay in classifying the object (ultimately, as a dwarf planet), and thus in officially naming it, it became widely known by the nickname used by the discovery team: Xena, after the titular character of the TV series Xena: Warrior Princess. Its satellite was similarly nicknamed Gabrielle, after the principal supporting character.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

  • (Greek goddess): Harmonia (goddess of harmony and concord)
  • (Discordian goddess): Aneris (goddess of order)
  • (dwarf planet): Dysnomia (satellite)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From erë (wind), probably contaminated with Ancient Greek ἔρις (éris, strife).

Proper nounEdit

Eris m

  1. A male given name.

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἔρις (Éris).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛrɪs]
  • Hyphenation: Eris

Proper nounEdit

Eris f

  1. (Greek mythology) Eris, the goddess of discord, confusion, and strife
    • 2014, Rudolf Mertlík, Příběhy Odysseovy[1], Praha: Albatros, →ISBN, page 9:
      Ve svatební síni se shromáždili všichni nebešťané kromě Eridy, bohyně sváru. Svatebčané se chtěli nerušeně radovat [] Proto Eridu nepozvali, neboť kam ona vkročí, tam vznikají spory a hádky. Eris jim však urážku neodpustila.
      All the heaven-borns besides Eris gathered in the wedding hall. The wedding guests did not want to be disturb while rejoicing [] That was why they had not invited Eris, because there arise quarrels and conflicts where she enters. However, Eris did not forgive them the offence.
  2. (astronomy, indeclinable) Eris, a dwarf planet and a large Kuiper belt object
    • 2017 October 12, “Jako šišatý Saturn. Vědci našli u trpasličí planety Haumea prstenec”, in Česká televize.cz[2]:
      Haumea byla uznána Mezinárodní astronomickou unií v roce 2008 a je jednou z pěti trpasličích planet vedle Pluta, Ceres, Eris a Makemake.
      Haumea was acknowledged by the International Astronomical Union in 2008 and is one of the five dwarf planets together with Pluto, Ceres, Eris and Makemake.

Usage notesEdit

The name of the goddess Eris is inflected following the Czech declension rules of feminine names of Greek origin, but when referring to the dwarf planet, the name is usually not inflected in practical usage and keeps the basic form Eris in all grammatical cases.

DeclensionEdit

(goddess):

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Solar System in in Czech · sluneční soustava (layout · text)
Star Slunce
Planets and dwarf planets Merkur Venuše Země Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturn Uran Neptun Pluto Haumea Makemake Eris
Notable moons Měsíc Phobos/Fobos
Deimos
Ganymed
Callisto
Io
Europa
Titan
Rhea
Iapetus
Dione
Tethys
Enceladus
Mimas
Titania
Oberon
Umbriel
Ariel
Miranda
Triton Charon
Hydra
Nix
Kerberos
Styx
Hiʻiaka
Namaka
Dysnomia

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

Proper nounEdit

Eris f (genitive Eris)

  1. (astronomy) Eris (dwarf planet)

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek Ἔρις (Éris).

Proper nounEdit

Eris f

  1. (Greek mythology) Eris

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Proper nounEdit

Eris m

  1. (Greek mythology) Eris (Greek goddess)
  2. (astronomy) Eris (dwarf planet)