See also: ceres, Cérès, and cerēs

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Ceres astronomical symbol

EtymologyEdit

Latin Cerēs, goddess of the bounty, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, to nourish). More at create.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪəɹiːz/
  • Hyphenation: Ce‧res

Proper nounEdit

Ceres

  1. (Roman mythology) The Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter.
  2. (astronomy) A celestial body orbiting between Mars and Jupiter, the largest asteroid and innermost dwarf planet; officially called 1 Ceres.
  3. A city in Stanislaus County, California, United States.

SynonymsEdit

  • (astronomy, astrology):

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Solar System in English · Solar System (layout · text)
Star Sun
Planets and
most likely
dwarf planets
Mercury Venus Earth Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Orcus Pluto Salacia Haumea Quaoar Makemake Gonggong Eris Sedna
Notable
moons
Moon Phobos
Deimos
Ganymede
Callisto
Io
Europa
Titan
Rhea
Iapetus
Dione
Tethys
Enceladus
Mimas
Titania
Oberon
Umbriel
Ariel
Miranda
Triton Vanth Charon
Hydra
Nix
Kerberos
Styx
Actaea Hiʻiaka
Namaka
Weywot (MK2) Xiangliu Dysnomia

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: Ce‧res

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch Ceres.

Proper nounEdit

Ceres

  1. (astronomy) Ceres
  2. (Roman mythology) Ceres

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English Ceres, from Latin Cerēs, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow).

Proper nounEdit

Ceres

  1. (Roman mythology) the Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter
  2. (astronomy) 1 Ceres, a celestial body orbiting between Mars and Jupiter, the largest asteroid and innermost dwarf planet

CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cerēs.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Ceres

  1. (Roman mythology, feminine) Ceres, Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter.
    • 2014, Mireia Ryšková, Pavel z Tarsu a jeho svět, Praha: Karolinum, →ISBN, page 436:
      Filón kritizuje i náboženská shromáždění a průvody k poctě bohyně Cerery, []
      Philo criticises also the religious meetings and parades in honour of the goddes Ceres, []
  2. (astronomy, feminine, masculine inanimate) Ceres, a dwarf planet orbiting between Mars and Jupiter
    • 2017 February 17, kar, “Na trpasličí planetě Ceres jsme našli organický materiál, oznámila NASA”, in ČT24[1], Česká televize, archived from the original on 2018-01-01:
      Mise Dawn, v jejímž rámci NASA zkoumá trpasličí planetu Ceres, našla důkazy o organickém materiálu.
      The Dawn mission, in which NASA explores the dwarf planet Ceres, found evidence of organic material.
    • 2017 October 24, Petr Kubala, “Sonda Dawn zůstane věrná Cereře”, in VTM[2], archived from the original on 2017-11-14:
      Dawn bude Cereru zkoumat i v době, kdy bude nejblíže od Slunce.
      Dawn is going to explore Ceres also during the time when it is nearest from the Sun.

Usage notesEdit

Both the name of the goddess and the celestial body are traditionally feminine, but in modern usage the latter one is sometimes also treated as indeclinable or inflected as masculine inanimate.

DeclensionEdit

feminine

(goddess, dwarf planet):

masculine inanimate

(dwarf planet):

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Solar System in Czech · sluneční soustava (layout · text)
Star Slunce
Planets and
most likely
dwarf planets
Merkur Venuše Země Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturn Uran Neptun {{{Orcus}}} Pluto {{{Salacia}}} Haumea {{{Quaoar}}} Makemake {{{Gonggong}}} Eris {{{Sedna}}}
Notable
moons
Měsíc Phobos/Fobos
Deimos
Ganymed
Callisto
Io
Europa
Titan
Rhea
Iapetus
Dione
Tethys
Enceladus
Mimas
Titania
Oberon
Umbriel
Ariel
Miranda
Triton {{{Vanth}}} Charon
Hydra
Nix
Kerberos
Styx
{{{Actaea}}} Hiʻiaka
Namaka
{{{Weywot}}} (MK2) {{{Xiangliu}}} Dysnomia

Further readingEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin Cerēs.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkeres/, [ˈke̞re̞s̠]
  • Syllabification: Ce‧res

NounEdit

Ceres

  1. (astronomy) Ceres

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of Ceres (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative Ceres
genitive Cereksen
partitive Cerestä
illative Cerekseen
singular plural
nominative Ceres
accusative nom. Ceres
gen. Cereksen
genitive Cereksen
partitive Cerestä
inessive Cereksessä
elative Cereksestä
illative Cerekseen
adessive Cereksellä
ablative Cerekseltä
allative Cerekselle
essive Cereksenä
translative Cerekseksi
instructive
abessive Cereksettä
comitative
Possessive forms of Ceres (type vastaus)
possessor singular plural
1st person Cerekseni Cereksemme
2nd person Cereksesi Cereksenne
3rd person Cereksensä

See alsoEdit

Solar System in Finnish · Aurinkokunta (layout · text)
Star Aurinko
Planets and
most likely
dwarf planets
Merkurius Venus Maa Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturnus Uranus Neptunus {{{Orcus}}} Pluto {{{Salacia}}} Haumea {{{Quaoar}}} Makemake {{{Gonggong}}} Eris {{{Sedna}}}
Notable
moons
Kuu Phobos
Deimos
Ganymedes
Kallisto
Io
Europa
Titan
Rhea
Japetus
Dione
Tethys
Enceladus
Mimas
Titania
Oberon
Umbriel
Ariel
Miranda
Triton {{{Vanth}}} Kharon
Hydra
Nix
Kerberos
Styx
{{{Actaea}}} Hiʻiaka
Namaka
{{{Weywot}}} (MK2) {{{Xiangliu}}} Dysnomia

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *kerēs, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerēs, from *ḱer- (to grow). Cognate with creō, crēscō.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Cerēs f sg (genitive Cereris); third declension

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres (Roman goddess)
  2. (astronomy, New Latin) Ceres (dwarf planet)
  3. (figuratively) food, bread, fruit, corn, grain, etc.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Cerēs
Genitive Cereris
Dative Cererī
Accusative Cererem
Ablative Cerere
Vocative Cerēs

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Ceres in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Ceres in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Ceres in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Ceres in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Ceres in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Ceres in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin Cerēs.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil including São Paulo) /ˈsɛ.ɾis/, [ˈsɛ.ɾis]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /ˈsɛ.ɾiʃ/, [ˈsɛ.ɾiʃ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈsɛ.ɾɨʃ/, [ˈsɛ.ɾɨʃ]

Proper nounEdit

Ceres f

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres (goddess of agriculture)

Proper nounEdit

Ceres m

  1. (astronomy) Ceres (dwarf planet in the Solar System)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈθeɾes/, [ˈθe.ɾes]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈseɾes/, [ˈse.ɾes]

Proper nounEdit

Ceres f

  1. (Roman mythology) the Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter

Proper nounEdit

Ceres m

  1. (astronomy) Ceres (dwarf planet)

SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

Proper nounEdit

Ceres

  1. Ceres (planet)

See alsoEdit

Solar System in Swahili · mfumo wa jua (see also: sayari) (layout · text)
Star jua
Planets and
most likely
dwarf planets
Utaridi
Zebaki
Zuhura
Ng'andu
dunia Mirihi
Murihi
Meriki
Ceres Mshtarii Sarateni
Zohari
Zohali (trad.)
Zuhali
Uranus
Zohali (mod.)
Neptun
Kausi
{{{Orcus}}} Pluto {{{Salacia}}} {{{Quaoar}}} {{{Gonggong}}} {{{Sedna}}}
Notable
moons
mwezi













{{{Vanth}}}



{{{Actaea}}}
{{{Weywot}}} (MK2) {{{Xiangliu}}}