See also: ceres, Cérès, and cerēs

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Ceres's planetary symbol
 
The dwarf planet Ceres

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin Cerēs, goddess of the bounty, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱer- (to grow, to nourish). More at create.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɪəɹiːz/
  • Hyphenation: Ce‧res

Proper noun edit

Ceres

  1. (Roman mythology) The Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter.
  2. (astronomy) A celestial body orbiting between Mars and Jupiter, the innermost dwarf planet; officially called (1) Ceres. (see usage notes)
  3. A city in Stanislaus County, California, United States.

Usage notes edit

Ceres is a dwarf planet, but there is some confusion about whether it is also an asteroid. A NASA webpage states that Vesta, the belt's second-largest object, is the largest asteroid.[1] The IAU has been equivocal on the subject,[2][3] though its Minor Planet Center, the organisation charged with cataloguing such objects, notes that dwarf planets may have dual designations,[4] and the joint IAU/USGS/NASA Gazetteer categorizes Ceres as both asteroid and a dwarf planet.[5]

Synonyms edit

  • (astronomy, astrology):

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Solar System in English · Solar System (layout · text)
Star Sun
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Mercury Venus Earth Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
Moon Phobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganymede
Callisto
Mimas
Enceladus
Tethys
Dione
Rhea
Titan
Iapetus

Miranda
Ariel
Umbriel
Titania
Oberon
Triton Charon Dysnomia

References edit

  1. ^ “Science: One Mission, Two Remarkable Destinations”, in (please provide the title of the work)[1], accessed 14 July 2020: “Asteroids range in size from Vesta – the largest at about 329 miles (530 km) in diameter ...”
  2. ^ Lang, Kenneth (2011) The Cambridge Guide to the Solar System[2], Cambridge University Press, →ISBN, retrieved 27 July 2019, pages 372, 442
  3. ^ “Question and answers 2”, in (please provide the title of the work)[3], IAU, accessed 31 January 2008: “Ceres is (or now we can say it was) the largest asteroid ... There are many other asteroids that can come close to the orbital path of Ceres.”
  4. ^ Spahr, T. B. (7 September 2006), “MPEC 2006-R19: EDITORIAL NOTICE”, in (please provide the title of the work)[4], Minor Planet Center, retrieved 31 January 2008: “the numbering of "dwarf planets" does not preclude their having dual designations in possible separate catalogues of such bodies.”
  5. ^ “Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature. Target: Ceres”, in (please provide the title of the work)[5], accessed 27 September 2021

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch Ceres.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: Ce‧res

Proper noun edit

Ceres

  1. (astronomy) Ceres
  2. (Roman mythology) Ceres

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin Cerēs.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Ceres f (related adjective Cereřin)

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres, Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter
    • 2014, Mireia Ryšková, Pavel z Tarsu a jeho svět, Praha: Karolinum, →ISBN, page 436:
      Filón kritizuje i náboženská shromáždění a průvody k poctě bohyně Cerery, []
      Philo criticises also the religious meetings and parades in honour of the goddes Ceres, []

Declension edit

when feminine:

when masculine inanimate (dwarf planet):

Proper noun edit

Ceres f or m inan

  1. (astronomy) Ceres, a dwarf planet orbiting between Mars and Jupiter
    • 2017 February 17, kar, “Na trpasličí planetě Ceres jsme našli organický materiál, oznámila NASA”, in ČT24[6], Česká televize, archived from the original on 19 February 2018:
      Mise Dawn, v jejímž rámci NASA zkoumá trpasličí planetu Ceres, našla důkazy o organickém materiálu.
      The Dawn mission, in which NASA explores the dwarf planet Ceres, found evidence of organic material.
    • 2017 October 24, Petr Kubala, “Sonda Dawn zůstane věrná Cereře”, in VTM[7], archived from the original on 2017-11-14:
      Dawn bude Cereru zkoumat i v době, kdy bude nejblíže od Slunce.
      Dawn is going to explore Ceres also during the time when it is nearest from the Sun.

Usage notes edit

  • Both the name of the goddess and the celestial body are traditionally feminine, but in modern usage the latter one is sometimes also treated as indeclinable or inflected as masculine inanimate.

Declension edit

when feminine:

when masculine:

See also edit

Solar System in Czech · sluneční soustava (layout · text)
Star Slunce
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Merkur Venuše Země Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturn Uran Neptun Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
Měsíc Phobos/Fobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganymed
Callisto
Mimas
Enceladus
Tethys
Dione
Rhea
Titan
Iapetus

Miranda
Ariel
Umbriel
Titania
Oberon
Triton Charon Dysnomia

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

First attested as Ceres in 1913. Borrowed from Latin Cerēs.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: Ce‧res

Proper noun edit

Ceres n

  1. A neighbourhood of Hollands Kroon, Noord-Holland, Netherlands.

Descendants edit

  • Afrikaans: Ceres

References edit

  • van Berkel, Gerard; Samplonius, Kees (2018), “ceres”, in Nederlandse plaatsnamen verklaard (in Dutch), Mijnbestseller.nl, →ISBN

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

From Latin Cerēs.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkeres/, [ˈk̟e̞re̞s̠]
  • Syllabification(key): Ce‧res

Proper noun edit

Ceres

  1. (astronomy) Ceres

Declension edit

Inflection of Ceres (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
nominative Ceres
genitive Cereksen
partitive Cerestä
illative Cerekseen
singular plural
nominative Ceres
accusative nom. Ceres
gen. Cereksen
genitive Cereksen
partitive Cerestä
inessive Cereksessä
elative Cereksestä
illative Cerekseen
adessive Cereksellä
ablative Cerekseltä
allative Cerekselle
essive Cereksenä
translative Cerekseksi
abessive Cereksettä
instructive
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of Ceres (Kotus type 39/vastaus, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative Cerekseni
accusative nom. Cerekseni
gen. Cerekseni
genitive Cerekseni
partitive Cerestäni
inessive Cereksessäni
elative Cereksestäni
illative Cerekseeni
adessive Cerekselläni
ablative Cerekseltäni
allative Cerekselleni
essive Cereksenäni
translative Cereksekseni
abessive Cereksettäni
instructive
comitative
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative Cereksesi
accusative nom. Cereksesi
gen. Cereksesi
genitive Cereksesi
partitive Cerestäsi
inessive Cereksessäsi
elative Cereksestäsi
illative Cerekseesi
adessive Cerekselläsi
ablative Cerekseltäsi
allative Cereksellesi
essive Cereksenäsi
translative Cerekseksesi
abessive Cereksettäsi
instructive
comitative
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative Cereksemme
accusative nom. Cereksemme
gen. Cereksemme
genitive Cereksemme
partitive Cerestämme
inessive Cereksessämme
elative Cereksestämme
illative Cerekseemme
adessive Cereksellämme
ablative Cerekseltämme
allative Cereksellemme
essive Cereksenämme
translative Cerekseksemme
abessive Cereksettämme
instructive
comitative
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative Cereksenne
accusative nom. Cereksenne
gen. Cereksenne
genitive Cereksenne
partitive Cerestänne
inessive Cereksessänne
elative Cereksestänne
illative Cerekseenne
adessive Cereksellänne
ablative Cerekseltänne
allative Cereksellenne
essive Cereksenänne
translative Cerekseksenne
abessive Cereksettänne
instructive
comitative
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative Cereksensä
accusative nom. Cereksensä
gen. Cereksensä
genitive Cereksensä
partitive Cerestään
Cerestänsä
inessive Cereksessään
Cereksessänsä
elative Cereksestään
Cereksestänsä
illative Cerekseensä
adessive Cereksellään
Cereksellänsä
ablative Cerekseltään
Cerekseltänsä
allative Cerekselleen
Cereksellensä
essive Cereksenään
Cereksenänsä
translative Cereksekseen
Cerekseksensä
abessive Cereksettään
Cereksettänsä
instructive
comitative

See also edit

Solar System in Finnish · Aurinkokunta (layout · text)
Star Aurinko
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Merkurius Venus Maa (Tellus) Mars Ceres Jupiter Saturnus Uranus Neptunus Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
Kuu Phobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganymedes
Kallisto
Mimas
Enceladus
Tethys
Dione
Rhea
Titan
Japetus

Miranda
Ariel
Umbriel
Titania
Oberon
Triton Kharon Dysnomia

Latin edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Italic *Kerēs, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱerēs, from *ḱer- (to grow). Cognate with creō, crēscō, Faliscan 𐌂𐌄𐌓𐌄𐌔 (ceres, Ceres) and Oscan Kerrí (dat. sg.).

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Cerēs f sg (genitive Cereris); third declension

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres (goddess of agriculture)
  2. (New Latin, astronomy) Ceres (dwarf planet)
  3. (figuratively) food, bread, fruit, corn, grain, etc.
    • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 1.177-179:
      Tum Cererem corruptam undīs Cereāliaque arma
      expediunt fessī rērum; frūgēsque receptās
      et torrēre parant flammīs et frangere saxō.
      Then, weary of [these] circumstances, they brought out [the grain of] Ceres, soaked with seawater, and the utensils of Ceres; and they prepared both to roast with flames and to grind with stone that grain [which] had been recovered.

Declension edit

Third-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Cerēs
Genitive Cereris
Dative Cererī
Accusative Cererem
Ablative Cerere
Vocative Cerēs

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Ceres”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Ceres”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Ceres in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Ceres in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Ceres”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Ceres”, in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin Cerēs.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡sɛ.rɛs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛrɛs
  • Syllabification: Ce‧res
  • Homophone: ceres

Proper noun edit

Ceres f (indeclinable)

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres (Roman goddess of agriculture and fertility)
  2. Ceres (dwarf planet)

See also edit

Solar System in Polish · Układ Słoneczny (layout · text)
Star Słońce
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Merkury Wenus Ziemia Mars Ceres Jowisz Saturn Uran Neptun Pluton Eris
Notable
moons
Księżyc Fobos
Deimos
Io
Europa
Ganimedes
Kallisto
Mimas
Enceladus
Tetyda
Dione
Rea
Tytan
Japet

Miranda
Ariel
Umbriel
Tytania
Oberon
Tryton Charon Dysnomia

Further reading edit

  • Ceres in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin Cerēs.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: Ce‧res

Proper noun edit

Ceres f

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres (goddess of agriculture)

Proper noun edit

Ceres m

  1. (astronomy) Ceres (dwarf planet in the Solar System)

Related terms edit

See also edit

Spanish edit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /ˈθeɾes/ [ˈθe.ɾes]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /ˈseɾes/ [ˈse.ɾes]
  • Rhymes: -eɾes
  • Syllabification: Ce‧res

Proper noun edit

Ceres f

  1. (Roman mythology) the Roman goddess of agriculture; equivalent to the Greek goddess Demeter

Proper noun edit

Ceres m

  1. (astronomy) Ceres (dwarf planet)

Swahili edit

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Ceres

  1. Ceres (planet)

See also edit

Solar System in Swahili · mfumo wa jua (see also: sayari) (layout · text)
Star jua
IAU planets and
notable dwarf planets
Utaridi
Zebaki
Zuhura
Ng'andu
dunia Mirihi
Murihi
Meriki
Ceres Mshtarii Zohali
Zuhali
Uranus Neptun Pluto Eris
Notable
moons
mwezi














Turkish edit

 
Turkish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia tr

Etymology edit

From Latin Cerēs.

Proper noun edit

Ceres

  1. (Roman mythology) Ceres (Roman goddess)
  2. (astronomy) Ceres (dwarf planet)