abbot

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English abbot, abbod, abbed, from Old English abbat, abbad, abbod, from Latin abbās ‎(father), from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς ‎(abbâs), from Aramaic אבא ‎(’abbā, father). Compare abba, abbé.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abbot ‎(plural abbots)

  1. The superior or head of an abbey or monastery. [First attested around the early 12th century.][1][2]
    The newly appointed abbot decided to take a tour of the abbey with the cardinal's emissary.
  2. A layman who received the abbey's revenues, after the closing of the monasteries.

Derived termsEdit

  • abbot of the people: a title formerly given to one of the chief magistrates in Genoa.
  • Abbot of Misrule (or Lord of Misrule), in medieval times, the master of revels, as at Christmas; in Scotland called the Abbot of Unreason

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Elliott K. Dobbie, C. William Dunmore, Robert K. Barnhart, et al. (editors), Chambers Dictionary of Etymology (Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, 2004 [1998], ISBN 0550142304), page 2
  2. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 3
  • Webster 1913

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

abbot c

  1. an abbot

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of abbot
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative abbot abboten abbotar abbotarna
Genitive abbots abbotens abbotars abbotarnas

Related termsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

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