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See also: ADO, Ado, adó, and -ado

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Northern Middle English at do (to do), supine of do, don (to do), see do. Influenced by Old Norse practice of marking supines using the preposition at, att (compare Danish at gå (to go)). More at at, do.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ado (uncountable)

  1. trouble; troublesome business; fuss
    • 1596-99?, William Shakespeare,The Merchant of Venice, Act I, scene i:
      In sooth, I know not why I am so sad.
      It wearies me; you say it wearies you;
      But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,
      What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born,
      I am to learn;
      And such a wantwit sadness makes of me,
      That I have much ado to know myself.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience
      Probably a crab would be filled with a sense of personal outrage if it could hear us class it without ado or apology as a crustacean, and thus dispose of it. “I am no such thing,” it would say; “I am myself, myself alone.”

Usage notesEdit

Ado is mostly used in set phrases, such as without further ado or much ado about nothing.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of adolescent.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /a.do/
  • (file)

NounEdit

ado m, f (plural ados)

  1. (colloquial) teen, teenager