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EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

  1. From the pinyin romanization of Chinese (Dào, literally the Way) or (dào, "circuit").
  2. From the pinyin romanization of Chinese (dāo, literally single-edged blade)

Proper nounEdit

dao

  1. (Chinese philosophy) Alternative form of Tao: the way of nature and/or the ideal way to live one's life.

NounEdit

dao (usually uncountable, plural daos)

  1. (historical) Synonym of circuit: various administrative divisions of imperial and early Republican China.
  2. A Chinese sword with a curved, single-edged blade, primarily used for slashing and chopping

Etymology 2Edit

From Tagalog or Cebuano dao.

NounEdit

dao (plural daos)

  1. Dracontomelon dao; a large tree of the family Anacardiaceae; the argus pheasant tree.
  2. The hard strong wood of the dao used for veneers and cabinetwork.

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: da‧o

NounEdit

dao

  1. dao (Dracontomelon dao)
  2. the edible fruit of this tree
  3. the wood from this tree

LimburgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

dao

  1. there

SynonymsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

dao

  1. for that reason

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

dao

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dāo.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of dáo.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of dǎo.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of dào.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Cebuano dao, Kapampangan dau and Indonesian dahu.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /daʔˈo/
  • Hyphenation: da‧o

NounEdit

dao

  1. dao (Dracontomelon dao)

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *-taːw, a non-Sino-Vietnamese reading of Chinese (“knife”; SV: đao). Compare North Central Vietnamese đao.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(classifier con) dao (, , )

  1. knife

Derived termsEdit