English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
a doormat (1)
 
a beer mat or coaster (2)
 
a yoga mat

From Middle English matte, from Old English meatte, from Late Latin matta, from Punic or Phoenician (compare Hebrew מיטה \ מִטָּה (mitá, bed, couch)).

Noun edit

mat (plural mats)

  1. A flat piece of coarse material used for wiping one’s feet, or as a decorative or protective floor covering.
    Wipe your feet on the mat before coming in.
  2. A small flat piece of material used to protect a surface from anything hot or rough; a coaster.
    They put mats on the table during mealtimes.
  3. (athletics) A floor pad to protect athletes.
    The high jumper cleared the bar and landed safely on the mat.
  4. A thickly tangled mess.
    a mat of weeds
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Grove Press, published 1959, →OCLC:
      But to return to where we left her, I see her still, propped up in a kind of stupor against one of the walls in which this wretched edifice abounds, her long grey greasy hair framing in its cowl of scrofulous mats a face where pallor, languor, hunger, acne, recent dirt, immemorial chagrin and surplus hair seemed to dispute the mastery.
  5. A thin layer of woven, non-woven, or knitted fiber that serves as reinforcement to a material.
  6. A thin surface layer; superficial cover.
    Iceland moss growing in a mat
    • 2016 November 15, Donald R. Prothero, The Princeton Field Guide to Prehistoric Mammals[1], page 222:
      The fad for blaming all mass extinctions (such as happened at the end of the Cretaceous when the dinosaurs vanished) on impacts of objects from space was extended to the Pleistocene in 2007. That year a group of scientists proposed that the North American extinctions were due to a comet or meteorite impact over the Carolinas, near the beginning of the Younger Dryas event, about 12,900 years ago. The original evidence for this supposed impact was a "black mat" of organic material in many Clovis sites, plus microscopic nano-diamonds in deep-sea cores, and rare Platinum group metals in Greenland ice cores from around 12,900 years ago.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Tok Pisin: mat
  • Japanese: マット (matto)
  • Russian: мат (mat)
  • Spanish: mat
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

mat (third-person singular simple present mats, present participle matting, simple past and past participle matted)

  1. (transitive) To cover, protect or decorate with mats.
  2. (intransitive) To form a thick, tangled mess; to interweave into, or like, a mat; to entangle.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

mat (plural mats)

  1. (video games, slang, chiefly Fortnite, in the plural) Clipping of material.
    I used up all my mats cranking 90s and ended up getting one-pumped.
    • 2019 October 24, Christopher Groux, “'Fortnite' Weapon Upgrade Guide - Upgrade Bench Locations & More”, in Newsweek[2], New York, N.Y.: Newsweek Publishing LLC, →ISSN, →OCLC, archived from the original on 2023-03-30:
      Using a Weapon Upgrade Bench, it's possible to upgrade a Common Shotgun, for example, all the way to Legendary provided you've harvested enough mats to do so.
    • [2020 November 28, Gökhan Çakır, “Common Fortnite terms and their meanings”, in Dot Esports[3], archived from the original on 2023-05-21:
      While there are game modes where you can build without any requirements, you'll need to harvest materials to build in normal Fortnite games. Mats is the shortened version of materials.]
    • 2021 September 25, Alan Bernal, “Viral Fortnite TikTok trick shows how to use Armored Walls for easy kills”, in Dexerto[4], archived from the original on 2021-10-26:
      Fortnite added a new trap with the Armored Wall reinforcement for mats and one viral TikTok showed just how deadly the new item can be in a close fight.
    • 2022 July 16, Sarthak Chauhan, “Fortnite YouTuber using 1000 mats in less than 30 seconds shows exactly what not to do”, in Sportskeeda[5], archived from the original on 2023-05-29:
      The looper goes on laying more than a thousand mats in thirty seconds. He finally reaches his opponent, who is easily brought down with a shell of a shotgun and a burst of an SMG. Upon eliminating the opponent, he is ecstatic in celebration.
Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Compare matte.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. (coppersmithing) An alloy of copper, tin, iron, etc.; white metal.

Etymology 4 edit

A clipped form of matinee.

Noun edit

mat (plural mats)

  1. (dated slang) Abbreviation of matinee (performance at a theater).
    • 1898, The Hotel/Motor Hotel Monthly, volume 6, page 27:
      A gents' toilet room might be found in a house that caters for the cheaper class of theatrical patronage, where the slangy language of the "goin' to the mat this aft?" style prevails. A gents toilet room is not found in the Southern Hotel. It either "men's" or "gentlemen's".

Etymology 5 edit

Noun edit

mat (plural mats)

  1. Alternative spelling of matte (decorative border around a picture)
    the mat of a daguerreotype

Etymology 6 edit

Adjective edit

mat

  1. Alternative form of matte (not reflecting light)
    • 2013, K. A. Spencer, Agromyzidae (Diptera) of Economic Importance, page 264:
      Frons mat black, orbits slightly paler, more greyish; mesonotum distinctly mat, greyish-black, but with some subshine; []

See also edit

etymologically unrelated terms containing the word "mat"

Etymology 7 edit

Noun edit

mat (plural mats)

  1. (printing) Short for matrix.

Anagrams edit

Ainu edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat (Kana spelling マッ)

  1. (mainly in compounds) woman, female
  2. wife
    mat etun
    take a wife

Verb edit

mat (Kana spelling マッ)

  1. take a wife
    te wano anak mat ka a=kor kusu ne.
    From now on, I'm going to get a wife, too.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

  • (antonym(s) of "woman"): okkayo (man)
  • (antonym(s) of "wife"): hoku (husband)

Derived terms edit


Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *mata, from pre-Albanian *mn̥to, from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to tower, stand out) (compare Welsh mynydd, Latin mōns, Avestan mati).[1]

Noun edit

mat m (plural mate, definite mati, definite plural matet)

  1. seacoast
  2. riverbank
  3. sandy shore, sandy beach

Synonyms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “mat”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 247

Atong (India) edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Garo mat/Garo mat-. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun edit

mat

  1. wild animal

Derived terms edit

References edit

Breton edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *matis (compare Irish maith).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mat

  1. good

Related terms edit

Mutation edit

Catalan edit

Noun edit

mat m (plural mats)

  1. checkmate

Derived terms edit

Czech edit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Persian شاه مات (šâh mât, literally the king is amazed).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat m inan

  1. checkmate

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • mat in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • mat in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • mat in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish edit

Adjective edit

mat (neuter mat, plural and definite singular attributive matte)

  1. dull, not shiny
  2. tired

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Dutch matte, borrowed from Latin matta. Cognates include English mat and German Matte.[1]

Noun edit

mat m or f (plural matten, diminutive matje n)

  1. rug, mat
  2. (hairstyle, chiefly diminutive) mullet
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Papiamentu: mat

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle Dutch mat (checkmate), borrowed from Old French mat, borrowed from Persian شاه مات (šâh mât, the king is dead).[1] Cognate to English checkmate.

Noun edit

mat n (plural matten)

  1. checkmate
Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle Dutch mat, borrowed from Old French mat, from Latin mattus (depressed).[1] See also French mat (adjective).

Adjective edit

mat (comparative matter, superlative matst)

  1. matte, not reflecting light
  2. dull, uninteresting
Inflection edit
Inflection of mat
uninflected mat
inflected matte
comparative matter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial mat matter het matst
het matste
indefinite m./f. sing. matte mattere matste
n. sing. mat matter matste
plural matte mattere matste
definite matte mattere matste
partitive mats matters
Derived terms edit

Verb edit

mat

  1. inflection of matten:
    1. first/second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. imperative

Etymology 4 edit

See Dutch meten.

Verb edit

mat

  1. singular past indicative of meten

References edit

  • mat” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]
  • Notes:
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

Anagrams edit

Emilian edit

 
Emiliano-Romagnolo Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eml

Alternative forms edit

  • mât (Modenese, Reggiano)

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: mat

Noun edit

mat m (plural mat) (Mirandola)

  1. insane

Synonyms edit

Faroese edit

Etymology edit

From the noun matur.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. accusative singular of matur.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology 1 edit

Probably from Latin mattus, which is from madere; see Italian matto.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mat (feminine mate, masculine plural mats, feminine plural mates)

  1. matt
  2. pale
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Abbreviation of the French expression échec et mat, from Persian شاه مات (šâh mât, the king is ambushed).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mat (feminine mate, masculine plural mats, feminine plural mates)

  1. checkmated

Noun edit

mat m (plural mats)

  1. checkmate

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Notes:
  1. ^ Picoche, Jacqueline with Jean-Claude Rolland (2009) “mat”, in Dictionnaire étymologique du français (in French), Paris: Dictionnaires Le Robert

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Garo edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. squirrel

Prefix edit

mat

  1. prefix for mammals

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

mat

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐍄

Icelandic edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

mat n (genitive singular mats, nominative plural möt)

  1. (usually uncountable) evaluation
Declension edit
Related terms edit
  • meta (to evaluate)

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

mat

  1. inflection of matur:
    1. indefinite accusative singular
    2. indefinite dative singular

Luxembourgish edit

Etymology edit

From Old High German mit, from Proto-Germanic *midi. Cognate with German mit, Dutch met, West Frisian mei, Icelandic með.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

mat

  1. with

Antonyms edit

Malay edit

Etymology edit

Shortening of Ahmad or Muhammad, two common Malay names.

Noun edit

mat (plural mat-mat, informal 1st possessive matku, 2nd possessive matmu, 3rd possessive matnya)

  1. (colloquial, slang) a certain person; a fellow; a dude.
  2. (colloquial, slang) a John Doe.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Maricopa edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. earth

Marshallese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Micronesian *masu, from Proto-Oceanic *masuʀ, contraction of Proto-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *mabosuʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bəsuʀ, from Proto-Austronesian *bəsuʀ. Cognate with Tongan mahu (abound in food).

Adjective edit

mat

  1. full (after eating), satiated

Etymology 2 edit

Adjective edit

mat

  1. cooked

References edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old French mat, a backformation from eschec mat (checkmate).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

mat

  1. (chess) Said when the opponent's king is captured.
Related terms edit
Descendants edit
References edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. checkmate, mate (moment of the opponent's king's capture)
Descendants edit
References edit

Adjective edit

mat

  1. checkmated, defeated (in chess)
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old French mat (defeated, tired), from Late Latin mattus. Compare modern English matte.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mat (plural and weak singular mate)

  1. vanquished, defeated, defenceless
  2. tired, fatigued
  3. depressed, sorrowful
  4. confused, afraid
Related terms edit
References edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. Alternative form of mate

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. Alternative form of matte

Etymology 5 edit

Verb edit

mat

  1. Alternative form of maten (to overpower)

Northern Sami edit

Pronoun edit

mat

  1. nominative plural of mii

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Pronunciation edit

IPA(key): /maːt/, [mɑːt̻]

Rhymes: -aːt

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse matr. Cognates include: Danish mad, Swedish mat, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍄𐍃 (mats), Old English mete (English meat).[1]

Noun edit

mat m (definite singular maten, uncountable)

  1. food
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

mat

  1. imperative of mate

References edit

  1. ^ Torp, Alf (1919) Nynorsk Etymologisk Ordbok, Oslo: H. Aschehoug and Co. (W. Nygaard)

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology edit

From Old Norse matr.

Noun edit

mat m (definite singular maten, uncountable)

  1. food

Derived terms edit

References edit

Old French edit

Adjective edit

mat m (oblique and nominative feminine singular mate)

  1. checkmated; in checkmate

Old Irish edit

Verb edit

mat

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of masu
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 4a27
      I⟨s⟩ samlid trá is lobur ar n-irnigde-ni, mat réte frecndirci gesme, et nín·fortéit-ni in spirut oc suidiu.
      Thus then our way of praying is feeble if present things are what we ask for, and the spirit does not help us with this.

Paipai edit

Noun edit

mat

  1. land

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Arabic مَات (māt), from Persian شاه مات (šâh mât).

Noun edit

mat m animal

  1. (chess) checkmate
Declension edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Dutch maat.

Noun edit

mat m pers

  1. (military, nautical) mate (ship's officer)
  2. (nautical) mate (in naval ranks, a non-commissioned officer)
Declension edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from German matt.

Noun edit

mat m inan

  1. matt, matte (dull colour or surface)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
adjective

Etymology 4 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

mat f

  1. genitive plural of mata

Further reading edit

  • mat in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mat in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French mat.

Adjective edit

mat m or n (feminine singular mată, masculine plural mați, feminine and neuter plural mate)

  1. matte

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Etymology edit

From Latin marītus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat m

  1. boy

Semai edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Aslian *mat, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *mat (eye). Cognate with Khmer មាត់ (mŏət), Mon မတ် (mòt), Vietnamese mắt, Car Nicobarese mat.

Noun edit

mat [1]

  1. eye

References edit

  1. ^ Basrim bin Ngah Aching (2008) Kamus Engròq Semay – Engròq Malaysia, Kamus Bahasa Semai – Bahasa Malaysia, Bangi: Institut Alam dan Tamadun Melayu, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

Slavomolisano edit

Etymology edit

From Serbo-Croatian mati.

Noun edit

mat f

  1. mother

Declension edit

References edit

  • Ivica Peša Matracki and Nada Županović Filipin (2014), Changes in the System of Oblique Cases in Molise Croatian Dialect.
  • Walter Breu and Giovanni Piccoli (2000), Dizionario croato molisano di Acquaviva Collecroce: Dizionario plurilingue della lingua slava della minoranza di provenienza dalmata di Acquaviva Collecroce in Provincia di Campobasso (Parte grammaticale).

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Derived from Arabic مَاتَ (māta) in Persian شاه مات (šâh mât, the king is dead).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat m inan (genitive singular matu, nominative plural maty, genitive plural matov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. the final move in a chess game, the checkmate

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • mat”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Anagrams edit

South Efate edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(m-)atay. Cognate to Big Nambas im'a.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

mat

  1. to die

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English mat.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmat/ [ˈmat̪]
  • Rhymes: -at
  • Syllabification: mat

Noun edit

mat m (plural mats)

  1. mat (for exercise)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse matr, from Proto-Germanic *matiz, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂d-.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat c

  1. food

Declension edit

Declension of mat 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative mat maten
Genitive mats matens

Derived terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Tok Pisin edit

Etymology edit

From English mat.

Noun edit

mat

  1. sitting or sleeping mat

Volapük edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mat (nominative plural mats)

  1. marriage, wedlock, matrimony

Declension edit

Derived terms edit