See also: Anar, Anár, añar, ānar, and -anar

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an Old Occitan verb (compare Occitan anar), possibly from Vulgar Latin *amnāre (to walk, to go), variant form of *amlāre, from Latin ambulāre, present active infinitive of ambulō (I travel, walk). However, amblar also existed in Old Occitan (compare Catalan and Occitan amblar). Compare also French aller. Alternatively, anar may derive from Vulgar Latin *and(i)tāre (to go (around)), from *ambitāre, frequentative of Latin ambiō, ambire (compare Spanish andar, Italian andare), or perhaps adnāre. The forms beginning with v- are from vadō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

anar (first-person singular present vaig, past participle anat)

  1. to go
  2. (auxiliary verb, taking an infinitive) Used to form the periphrastic preterite; see usage notes below for more information.
    Ahir vaig parlar amb ma germana.
    Yesterday, I spoke with my sister.

ConjugationEdit

Usage notesEdit

The second set of conjugations are used along with the infinitive of another verb in order to form the "periphrastic past" (passat perifràstic), an analytical construction equivalent in terms of tense and aspect to the simple preterite. For example, vaig cantar bears the same meaning as cantí ('I sang').

The indicative forms of the auxiliary, except for the third-person singular, may be reinforced with -re-, but, in the standard language, only when the corresponding normal first-conjugation simple preterite endings have it. For example, vares cantar may be used instead of vas cantar but not *vàreig cantar instead of vaig cantar; compare the typical second-person singular ending -ares with its first-person singular equivalent -í. The subjunctive forms are literary and only sporadically occur, and so rather than the periphrastic past subjunctive, it is typical for the imperfect subjunctive to be used (therefore cantés rather than vagi cantar, for example), despite the demand for the perfective aspect.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

anar (plural anars)

  1. anarchist

KottEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔan- "haunch". Compare Arin an and Pumpokol aniŋ "legs".

NounEdit

anar

  1. haunch

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an Old Occitan verb (compare Catalan anar), possibly from a Vulgar Latin *and(it)āre, from *ambitāre, frequentative of Latin ambiō, ambīre (compare Spanish andar, Italian andare), or perhaps adnāre. Alternatively from a Vulgar Latin *amnāre < *amlāre, from Latin ambulāre, present active infinitive of ambulō (however, Old Occitan had a separate word amblar, whence Catalan and Occitan amblar). Compare also French aller. The forms beginning with v- are from vadō.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

anar

  1. to go

ConjugationEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

anar

  1. present tense of ana.

AnagramsEdit