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CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin gustō, gustāre, possibly a semi-learned term or early borrowing; cf. gust.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gustar (first-person singular present gusto, past participle gustat)

  1. to taste
    Synonym: tastar

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Latin gusto, gustare. Compare Portuguese gostar.

VerbEdit

gustar (first-person singular present gusto, first-person singular preterite gustei, past participle gustado)

  1. to please, like
  2. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of gustar
  3. first/third-person singular personal infinitive of gustar

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

gustar (present tense gustas, past tense gustis, future tense gustos, imperative gustez, conditional gustus)

  1. to taste

ConjugationEdit


RomanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Either from gust +‎ -ar or from Latin augustālis, from augustus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gustar

  1. (popular/folk usage) August (eighth month of the Gregorian calendar)

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed in this form from Latin gustāre, present active infinitive of gustō. Replaced the inherited Old Spanish form gostar[1]. See gusto. The use of this verb to mean "like" is a uniquely Ibero-Romance development.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡusˈtaɾ/, [ɡusˈt̪aɾ]

VerbEdit

gustar (first-person singular present gusto, first-person singular preterite gusté, past participle gustado)

  1. (intransitive) (followed by a or preceded by an indirect object) to be pleasing to (usually translated into English as like with exchange of the subject and object)
    Me gusta esta manzanaI like this apple. (literally, “This apple is pleasing to me.”)
  2. (intransitive, dated) to taste

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Gustar is usually translated to English with the verb to like. This causes confusion for some English speakers studying Spanish, because the subject and object of gustar are seemingly reversed from those of to like. That is, the subject of gustar is the thing that pleases and the (indirect) object is the person who is pleased. A commonly used method is to think of gustar as literally meaning to be pleasing to.

Me gusta la canción.I like the song. (literally, “The song is pleasing to me.”)
No me gustan las espinacas.I don't like spinach. (literally, “The spinach is not pleasing to me.”)
¿Te gusto?Do you like me? (literally, “Am I pleasing to you?”)
Le gusto a MaríaMaria likes me. (literally, “I am pleasing to Maria.”)

However, compare with the archaic meaning of to like:

No me gusta su semblante.His countenance likes me not.

ConjugationEdit

ExpressionsEdit

a X le(s) gusta(n) Y

  • X like(s) Y.
    A los pájaros les gusta cantar.Birds like to sing.
    A la chica le gustan las flores.The girl likes flowers.
    A María le gusta el jugo de manzana.Mary likes apple juice.

a mí me gusta(n) Y

  • I like Y.

a ti te gusta(n) Y

  • You like Y.

a nosotros nos gusta(n) Y

  • We like Y.
    A nosotros nos gusta divertirnos en el jardín. — We like to have fun in the garden.

a vosotros os gusta(n) Y

  • You like Y.

a usted le gusta(n) Y

  • You like Y.

Usage notesEdit

X must agree in number (and person) with "le(s)," and Y must agree in number with "gusta(n)."

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit