EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English barm, barme, berm, bearm, from Old English bearm (lap; bosom), from Proto-Germanic *barmaz (lap; bosom), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear). Cognate with German Barm (lap; bosom).

NounEdit

barm (plural barms)

  1. (obsolete outside dialects) Bosom, lap.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English berme, berm, from Old English beorma, from Proto-West Germanic *bermō (yeast; barm); related to the dialectal Low German Bärm (yeast), from Middle Low German barm, berm. The cake sense is possibly a shortened form of barmcake, which would be made with yeast as described in that sense, or possibly it is from the Irish bairín breac, a type of bread.

NounEdit

barm (countable and uncountable, plural barms)

  1. Foam rising upon beer, or other malt liquors, when fermenting, and used as leaven in making bread and in brewing; yeast.
    • 1590?, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Act II. scene i. line 25:
      ...and sometimes make the drink to bear no barm.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 620:
      In 1577 yeast, called barm, is bought at 9d. the pail.
    • 1913, DH Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, Penguin 2006, p. 65:
      And he chaffed the women as he served them their ha'porths of barm.
  2. A small, flat, round individual loaf or roll of bread.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English bermen, from the noun (see above).

VerbEdit

barm (third-person singular simple present barms, present participle barming, simple past and past participle barmed)

  1. To spurge; foam

See alsoEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German warm, from Old High German warm, from Proto-Germanic *warmaz (warm). Cognate with German warm, Dutch warm, English warm, Icelandic varmur.

AdjectiveEdit

barm (comparative bérmor, superlative dar bérmorste)

  1. (Luserna, Sette Comuni) warm, hot
    Hòite machetz barm.It's hot today.

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “barm” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo
  • “barm” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse baðmr (bosom).

NounEdit

barm c (singular definite barmen, plural indefinite barme)

  1. bosom
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse barmr (rim).

NounEdit

barm c (singular definite barmen, plural indefinite barme)

  1. (nautical, archaic) a corner of a sail
InflectionEdit

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

barm

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐍂𐌼

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

barm

  1. indefinite accusative singular of barmur

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English bearm, from Proto-Germanic *barmaz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barm (plural barmes)

  1. The lap (The portion of one's legs that lies flat while sitting)
    • Late 14th century: And with that word this faucon gan to crie / And swowned eft in Canacees barm. — Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Squire's Tale’, Canterbury Tales
  2. chest, torso, abdomen
    • Late 14th century: [...] kisse hire child er that it deyde / And in hir barm this litel child she leyde. — Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Clerk's Tale’, Canterbury Tales
  3. belly, stomach
  4. (rare) A flat surface that serves as a resting-place.
DescendantsEdit
  • English: barm
  • Scots: berme, berm, barm
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English beorma.

NounEdit

barm

  1. Alternative form of berme (yeast)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse baðmr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barm m (definite singular barmen, indefinite plural barmar, definite plural barmane)

  1. a bosom

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse baðmr (bosom).

NounEdit

barm c

  1. bosom

DeclensionEdit

Declension of barm 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative barm barmen barmar barmarna
Genitive barms barmens barmars barmarnas