See also: Borg and bôrg

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of "cybernetic organism", via cyborg

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɔː(ɹ)ɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)ɡ

NounEdit

borg (plural borgs)

  1. cyborg
    • 2003, Dalos Gaymer, “Gotcha Force Review for GameCube”, GameFAQs:
      You'll also have to put together a team or Force of borgs that you won from winning battles. Before battle you assemble your Force within the GF Energy Limit. Each borg has a cost attached to them and this GF Energy Limit is kind of like your budget.

VerbEdit

borg (third-person singular simple present borgs, present participle borging, simple past and past participle borged)

  1. Alternative spelling of Borg

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

borg m

  1. (Sette Comuni) furrow (trench cut in soil)

ReferencesEdit

  • “borg” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse borg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz (stronghold, city), cognate with German Burg (castle) and English borough. The Germanic noun is derived from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise), which is also the source of Danish bjerg (mountain).

NounEdit

borg c (singular definite borgen, plural indefinite borge)

  1. castle, stronghold
InflectionEdit
Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German borg, borge. Compare German Borg (credit).

NounEdit

borg c

  1. (dated) credit
    borg.On credit.

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

borg

  1. imperative of borge (to guarantee, vouch for)

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch borge.

NounEdit

borg m (plural borgen)

  1. surety, bail
    Synonyms: borgtocht, cautie
  2. guarantor
  3. deposit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Negerhollands: borg
  • Indonesian: boreh
  • Papiamentu: bòrg, borg, borg

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

borg

  1. singular past indicative of bergen
  2. first-person singular present indicative of borgen
  3. imperative of borgen

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse borg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz (stronghold, city), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fort). Related to berg (mountain), bjørg (mountain side).

NounEdit

borg f (genitive singular borgar, plural borgir)

  1. castle, stronghold
DeclensionEdit
Declension of borg
f2 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative borg borgin borgir borgirnar
accusative borg borgina borgir borgirnar
dative borg borgini borgum borgunum
genitive borgar borgarinnar borga borganna

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Danish borg, from Middle Low German borg, borge. Compare German Borg (credit).

NounEdit

borg n (genitive singular borgs, uncountable)

  1. bail
  2. (dated) credit
    At keypa upp á borg.
    To buy on credit.
DeclensionEdit
Declension of borg (singular only)
n3s singular
indefinite definite
nominative borg borgið
accusative borg borgið
dative borgi borginum
genitive borgs borgsins
SynonymsEdit

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse borg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-. Related to berg, bjarg (rock, cliff).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

borg f (genitive singular borgar, nominative plural borgir)

  1. city
  2. castle
  3. a rocky hill (with cliffs)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


IrishEdit

NounEdit

borg m (genitive singular boirg, nominative plural boirg)

  1. Alternative form of buirg (borough)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
borg bhorg mborg
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse borg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz (stronghold, city), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fort).

NounEdit

borg m or f (definite singular borga or borgen, indefinite plural borger, definite plural borgene)

  1. a castle (fortified building)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse borg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz (stronghold, city), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fort).

NounEdit

borg f (definite singular borga, indefinite plural borger, definite plural borgene)

  1. a castle

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

borg m (nominative plural borgas)

  1. pledge

DeclensionEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fortified elevation).

NounEdit

borg f (genitive borgar, plural borgir)

  1. A city, town (often fortified)
  2. A castle
  3. Any fortified place

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • borg in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish borgh (fortress, city), from Old Norse borg (also "bulwark", "wall'), from Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-. Akin to English borough, burgh, Old Irish bri (hence the name Birgitta).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

borg c

  1. a fortified castle (or city)
DeclensionEdit
Declension of borg 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative borg borgen borgar borgarna
Genitive borgs borgens borgars borgarnas
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English, from cyborg.

NounEdit

borg c

  1. a borg
DeclensionEdit
Declension of borg 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative borg borgen borger borgerna
Genitive borgs borgens borgers borgernas