See also: Rocky and Rockies

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English rokki, rokky (rocky),[1] from rok, rokke (rock; a rock or stone; large rock by a coast or in the sea; rocky outcrop on a mountain, cliff; castle, citadel, stronghold) [and other forms][2] + -i (suffix forming adjectives).[3] Rok, rokke are derived from:

both from Medieval Latin roca, rocca; further etymology uncertain, possibly of Celtic origin. The English word is analysable as rock +‎ -y (suffix forming adjectives meaning ‘having the quality of’).[4][5]

AdjectiveEdit

rocky (comparative rockier or more rocky, superlative rockiest or most rocky)

  1. Abounding in, or full of, rocks; consisting of rocks.
    a rocky mountain    a rocky shore
  2. Like a rock; rigid, solid.
    Synonyms: flinty; rocklike, rock-like; stonelike
  3. Of an animal or plant: having a habitat around on on rocks.
  4. (figuratively, archaic) Not easily affected or impressed; hard; obdurate; unfeeling.
    to have a rocky heart
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From rock (to move back and forth) +‎ -y (suffix forming adjectives meaning ‘having the quality of’).[5][6] Rock is derived from Middle English rokken (to move (something, such as a cradle) back and forth; to move or sway back and forth in an unstable manner; to go) [],[7] from Old English roccian (to rock), from Proto-Germanic *rukkōną (to move; to move back and forth, rock), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rewk- (to dig; to till (soil)).

AdjectiveEdit

rocky (comparative rockier or more rocky, superlative rockiest or most rocky)

  1. Easily rocked; unstable.
    Synonyms: tottering, wobbly
    The table was rocky, so we put a book under one leg.
  2. (figuratively)
    1. Encountering many problems; difficult, troubled; also, in danger or distress.
      (encountering many problems): Synonyms: hard, tough; see also Thesaurus:difficult
      (in danger): Synonyms: unsteady; see also Thesaurus:unsteady
      Their relationship had weathered some rocky times, but they loved each other.
    2. (originally US) Of a person: ill, or unsteady (for example, as a result of a shock).
      Synonyms: shaky, unnerved, weakened
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From rock (rock and roll music) +‎ -y (suffix forming adjectives meaning ‘having the quality of’).[5][8]

AdjectiveEdit

rocky (comparative rockier or more rocky, superlative rockiest or most rocky)

  1. In the style of rock music.
    Synonyms: rockish; rockesque; rocklike, rock-like
    His new album is quite rocky.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ rokkī, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ rok(ke, n.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  3. ^ -ī̆, suf.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ Compare “rocky, adj.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2021.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 rocky, adj.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  6. ^ rocky, adj.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2021.
  7. ^ rokken, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  8. ^ rocky, adj.3”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2019.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit