See also: Bunting

Contents

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Bunting on display for day 3 of the 2012 Olympic torch relay, in Devon, UK
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Possibly from dialect bunting ‎(sifting flour), from Middle English bonten ‎(to sift), hence the material used for that purpose.

NounEdit

bunting ‎(plural buntings)

  1. Strips of material used as festive decoration, especially in the colours of the national flag.
  2. (nautical) A thin cloth of woven wool from which flags are made; it is light enough to spread in a gentle wind but resistant to fraying in a strong wind.
  3. Flags considered as a group.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A black-headed bunting (Emberiza melanocephala)
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From circa 1300, from bountyng, of unknown origin. Possibly from buntin ‎(plump) (compare baby bunting, Scots buntin ‎(short and thick), Welsh bontin ‎(rump) and bontinog ‎(big-arsed)), or a double diminutive of French bon. Or possibly a reference to speckled plumage, from an unrecorded Old English word akin to German bunt ‎(multi-coloured), Dutch bont.[1]

NounEdit

bunting ‎(plural buntings)

  1. Any of various songbirds, mostly of the genus Emberiza, having short bills and brown or gray plumage.
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See bunt.

VerbEdit

bunting

  1. present participle of bunt

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ bunting at Online Etymology Dictionary
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