quarter

See also: quarter- and Quarter

EnglishEdit

English numbers (edit)
 ←  3 4 5  → 
    Cardinal: four
    Ordinal: fourth, tetarto-
    Latinate ordinal: quartary, quaternary
    Multiplier: quadruple, fourfold
    Distributive: quadruply
    Collective: tetrad, foursome
    Fractional: quarter, fourth
    Number of musicians: quartet

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English quarter, from Anglo-Norman quarter, from Latin quartarius, from quartus. Compare Spanish cuarto (room, quarters; quarter). Doublet of quartier.

NounEdit

quarter (countable and uncountable, plural quarters)

 
A US quarter, 25 cent coin.
  1. A fourth part of something.
    1. (in general sense) Each of four equal parts into which something can be divided; a fourth part. [from 14th c.]
      A quarter of an hour.
    2. (now chiefly historical) A measure of capacity used chiefly for grain or coal, varying greatly in quantity by time and location. [from 13th c.]
      • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, volume 4, page 204:
        One of these is 1 Hen. V, cap. 10, defining the quarter of corn to be eight struck bushels, and putting fines on purveyors who take more.
    3. A fourth part of a pound; approximately 113 grams. [from 14th c.]
    4. (historical) A measure of length; originally a fourth part of an ell, now chiefly a fourth part of a yard. [from 14th c.]
    5. (now historical) A fourth part of the night; one of the watches or divisions of the night. [from 14th c.]
      • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Mark 6:48
        And aboute the fourth quartre of the nyght, he cam unto them, walkinge apon the see [...].
    6. (now chiefly financial) A fourth part of the year; 3 months; a term or season. [from 14th c.]
    7. A fourth part of an hour; a period of fifteen minutes, especially with reference to the quarter before or after the hour. [from 15th c.]
    8. (now chiefly historical) A fourth part of a hundredweight. [from 15th c.]
    9. (heraldry) A fourth part of a coat of arms, or the charge on it, larger than a canton and normally on the upper dexter side, formed by a perpendicular line from the top meeting a horizontal line from the side. [from 15th c.]
    10. (Canada, US) A quarter-dollar, divided into 25 cents; the coin of that value minted in the United States or Canada. [from 18th c.]
    11. (sports) One of four equal periods into which a game is divided. [from 19th c.]
    12. (Chester, historical) A quarter of an acre or 40 roods.[1]
  2. Place or position.
    1. A region or place. [from 13th c.]
      • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
        I am to haste, / And all who under me thir Banners wave, / Homeward with flying march where we possess / The Quarters of the North [] .
    2. Each of four parts into which the earth or sky is divided, corresponding to the four cardinal points of the compass. [from 14th c.]
    3. A division or section of a town or city, especially having a particular character of its own, or associated with a particular group etc. [from 16th c.]
    4. One's residence or dwelling-place; (in plural) rooms, lodgings, especially as allocated to soldiers or domestic staff. [from 16th c.]
    5. (obsolete) Relations between people. [17th c.]
    6. (figuratively, archaic) A topic or area of endeavour.
      • 1892, Robert Louis Stevenson, The Wrecker (chapter 10)
        “I'll tell you something, too,” retorted the captain, duskily flushing. “I wouldn't sail this ship for the man you are, if you went upon your knees. I've dealt with gentlemen up to now.”
        “I can tell you the names of a number of gentlemen you'll never deal with any more, and that's the whole of Longhurst's gang,” said Jim. “I'll put your pipe out in that quarter, my friend. Here, rout out your traps as quick as look at it, and take your vermin along with you. I'll have a captain in, this very night, that's a sailor, and some sailors to work for him.”
    7. Accommodation given to a defeated opponent; mercy; exemption from being killed. [from 17th c.]
      • 1955, J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King, page 1110:
        Hard fighting and long labour they had still; for the Southrons were bold men and grim, and fierce in despair, and the Easterlings were strong and war-hardened and asked for no quarter.
  3. Technical or specialized senses.
    1. (farriery) The part on either side of a horse's hoof between the toe and heel, the side of its coffin. [from 16th c.]
      • 1877, Anna Sewell, chapter 23, in Black Beauty[1]:
        [] at last she kicked right over the carriage pole and fell down, after giving me a severe blow on my near quarter.
    2. (nautical) The aftmost part of a vessel's side, roughly from the last mast to the stern. [from 16th c.]
      • 1808–10, William Hickey, Memoirs of a Georgian Rake, Folio Society 1995, p. 80:
        I was one morning walking the deck, when Rogers, whose watch it was, sitting upon the quarter, called to me in his usual style, ‘Come here, Bill.’
      • 1863, Charles Reade, Hard Cash[2]:
        “My men, the schooner coming up on our weather quarter is a Portuguese pirate.”
  4. Short forms.
    1. (now rare, rugby, American football) A quarterback. [from 19th c.]
    2. (military slang, now rare) A quartermaster; a quartermaster sergeant. [from 20th c.]
      • 1925, Ford Madox Ford, “Parade's End”, in No More Parades, Penguin, published 2012, page 360:
        Tietjens said: ‘Send the Canadian sergeant-major to me at the double….’ to the quarter.
    3. A quarterfinal. [from 20th c.]
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Robert Holland, M.R.A.C., A Glossary of Words Used in the County of Chester, Part I--A to F., English Dialect Society, London, 1884, 3

AdjectiveEdit

quarter (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to an aspect of a quarter.
  2. (chiefly) Consisting of a fourth part, a quarter (14, 25%).
    a quarter hour; a quarter century; a quarter note; a quarter pound
  3. (chiefly) Related to a three-month term, a quarter of a year.
    A quarter day is one terminating a quarter of the year.
    A quarter session is one held quarterly at the end of a quarter.
AntonymsEdit
Usage notesEdit

Often used in a combining form quarter-.

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

quarter (third-person singular simple present quarters, present participle quartering, simple past and past participle quartered)

  1. (transitive) To divide into quarters; to divide by four.
  2. (transitive) To provide housing for military personnel or other equipment.
    Quarter the horses in the third stable.
  3. (intransitive) To lodge; to have a temporary residence.
  4. (transitive) To quartersaw.
    • 1758, Thomas Hale, A Compleat Body Of Husbandry, page 333:
      But there is, as in other woods, a great deal of difference between this and the quartered timber.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Adjective
  • "quarter" at Merriam-Webster
  • "quarter" in Harrap's Shorter, 2006, p. 761

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French cartayer.

VerbEdit

quarter (third-person singular simple present quarters, present participle quartering, simple past and past participle quartered)

  1. (obsolete) To drive a carriage so as to prevent the wheels from going into the ruts, or so that a rut shall be between the wheels.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quartus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quarter m (plural quarters)

  1. fourth
  2. quarter

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quarter m (plural quarters)

  1. quarter (old measure of corn)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman quarter.

NounEdit

quarter (plural quarters)

  1. quarter

DescendantsEdit

  • English: quarter
  • Yola: curthere, cortere

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

quarter m (oblique plural quarters, nominative singular quarters, nominative plural quarter)

  1. (chiefly Anglo-Norman) quarter (one fourth)

ReferencesEdit