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cleven

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Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch clivon, from Proto-Germanic *klibjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gleybʰ- (to stick).

VerbEdit

clēven

  1. to stick, to adhere

InflectionEdit

This verbs needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • cleven (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • cleven (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English clēofan, from Proto-Germanic *kleubaną.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cleven

  1. To cleave; to split or slice through:
    1. To slice or slash at; to make a slicing blow.
    2. To make a crack, cut or slice in something.
    3. To chop off; to seperate or sunder.
  2. To break into small pieces; to disintegrate or shatter.
  3. To open up; to reveal itself or oneself.
  4. To cause the destruction or end of something; to ruin or finish.
  5. To stab someone mortally or fatally (by striking at their heart)
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English clēofian, from Proto-Germanic *klibjaną.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkleːvən/, /ˈklɛːvən/, /ˈkliːvən/

VerbEdit

cleven

  1. To stick or adhere (use of this sense is often accompanied by on and to):
    1. To have cohesion or unity; to adhere to each other.
    2. To cling; to hold onto something; to choose to stick to something.
      • 1395 Wycliffe Bible, General Prologue: 15-16.
        Therfor, whanne the vois was reisid, eft thei bigunnen to wepe. Orpha kisside the modir of hir hosebonde, and turnede ayen, and Ruth cleuyde to the modir of hir hosebonde.
        Afterwards, when the voice was raised, they began to weep again. Orpah kissed the mother of her husband, and turned around, and Ruth cleaved to the mother of her husband.
  2. To be adhesive, sticky, or gluey; to cause things to stick or adhere.
  3. To be an inherent or inseparable portion or bit of something; to be intrinsic or innate to something.
  4. To withstand, stay put, or settle; to weather or last through time.
  5. To believe or follow a creed or belief; to trust or serve someone.
  6. (rare) To stay balanced or coherent.
  7. (rare) To convince; to spread one's beliefs.
  8. (rare) To gain wealth or belongings.
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit