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See also: confiné

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French confiner, from confins, from Medieval Latin confines, from Latin confinium, from Latin confīnis.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

confine (third-person singular simple present confines, present participle confining, simple past and past participle confined)

  1. (transitive) To restrict; to keep within bounds; to shut or keep in a limited space or area.
    • Shakespeare
      Now let not nature's hand / Keep the wild flood confined! let order die!
    • Dryden
      He is to confine himself to the compass of numbers and the slavery of rhyme.
  2. To have a common boundary; to border; to lie contiguous; to touch; followed by on or with.
    • Milton
      Where your gloomy bounds / Confine with heaven
    • Dryden
      Betwixt heaven and earth and skies there stands a place / Confining on all three.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

confine (plural confines)

  1. Limit.

TranslationsEdit

SynonymsEdit


FrenchEdit

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin confīnis.

NounEdit

confine m (plural confini)

  1. border, frontier
  2. boundary

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

confine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of confinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of confinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of confinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of confinar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

confine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of confinar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of confinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of confinar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of confinar.