confine

See also: confiné

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French confiner, from confins, from Medieval Latin confines, from Latin confinium, from confīnis.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

confine (third-person singular simple present confines, present participle confining, simple past and past participle confined)

  1. (obsolete) To have a common boundary with; to border on. [16th–19th c.]
  2. (transitive) To restrict (someone or something) to a particular scope or area; to keep in or within certain bounds. [from 17th c.]

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

confine (plural confines)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) A boundary or limit.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

confine

  1. inflection of confiner:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin confīnis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /konˈfi.ne/
  • Rhymes: -ine
  • Hyphenation: con‧fì‧ne

NounEdit

confine m (plural confini)

  1. border, frontier
  2. boundary

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cōnfīne

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of cōnfīnis

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

confine

  1. inflection of confinar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

confine

  1. inflection of confinar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative