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See also: co-star

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From co- +‎ star.

NounEdit

costar (plural costars)

  1. (acting) a person who shares star billing
    The once famous actor objected to his costar having a bigger dressing room.
  2. (acting) a person who slightly lacks the status to be considered a star
    Alas, always a costar but never a star.

VerbEdit

costar (third-person singular simple present costars, present participle costarring, simple past and past participle costarred)

  1. to perform with the billing of a costar.
    People thought his career was over but now he will get to costar on Broadway next month.
    • 2012 June 3, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Mr. Plow” (season 4, episode 9; originally aired 11/19/1992)”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1]:
      Purchasing a snowplow transforms Homer into a new man. Mr. Burns' laziest employee suddenly becomes an ambitious self-starter who buys ad time on local television at 3:17 A.M (prime viewing hours, Homer gingerly volunteers, for everyone from alcoholics to the unemployable to garden-variety angry loners) and makes a homemade commercial costarring his family.

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō.

VerbEdit

costar (first-person singular indicative present costo, past participle costáu)

  1. to cost (incur a charge, a price)

ConjugationEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan costar, from Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō. Doublet of constar, a borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

costar (first-person singular present costo, past participle costat)

  1. to cost (have a given price)
    • 2009, Jean Grave, Les Aventures d'en Nono:
      Digues, mare, quant costarà un llibre de contes[?]
      Tell me, mother, how much does a story book cost?
  2. to be very difficult

ConjugationEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan costar, from Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō.

VerbEdit

costar

  1. to cost

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish costar, from Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō. Doublet of constar, a borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kosˈtaɾ/, [kosˈt̪aɾ]

VerbEdit

costar (first-person singular present cuesto, first-person singular preterite costé, past participle costado)

  1. to cost
  2. to find (something) very difficult, to have a hard time with something
    Cuando estoy de pie, me cuesta respirar.When I'm standing, I find it hard to breathe.
    Le cuesta mucho pronunciar esa palabra.He has a really hard time pronouncing that word.

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: o becomes a ue in stressed syllables.

Related termsEdit


VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin constāre, present active infinitive of constō. Compare Italian costare.

VerbEdit

costar

  1. (intransitive) to cost

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.