See also: männ, Mann, and Mànn

CimbrianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German man, from Old High German man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Cognate with German Mann, Dutch man, English man, Icelandic maður, Swedish man, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

NounEdit

mann m (plural mannediminutive ménle) (Sette Comuni)

  1. man
  2. husband

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “mann” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien
  • “mann” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

CornishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

mann

  1. at all

NounEdit

mann m

  1. nothing, nil

NumeralEdit

mann

  1. zero

FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

mann

  1. accusative singular of maður

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

mann

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽

IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

mann m

  1. indefinite accusative singular of maður

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Backformation from the comparative manner, from Old High German minniro (less; fewer), from Proto-Germanic *minnizô, and/or reinterpretation (as a positive) of Old High German min (less), from Proto-Germanic *minniz, adverbial form of the former. Compare the same in Dutch min. The Luxembourgish vocalism is regular through -i--a- in closed syllables.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mann (masculine mann, neuter mann, comparative manner, superlative am mannsten)

  1. little, few

Usage notesEdit

  • The positive and comparative forms are indeclinable and cannot be preceded by articles or determiners. The superlative is declined in the normal way.

DeclensionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.


NornEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse maðr.

NounEdit

mann m

  1. man
  2. married man
  3. master of the house

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mann, accusative case of maðr (man) (compare the accusative of Icelandic maður). Originally the word only had the sense "human" but later changed to primarily designate an adult male, the original meaning being replaced by words such as menneske and person. Believed to ultimately be from Proto-Germanic *mann-, stemming from the Proto-Indo-European *man- (a root). Cognate with Swedish man, Danish mand, Faroese and Icelandic maður, English man and many others.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mann m (definite singular mannen, indefinite plural menn, definite plural mennene)

  1. a man (adult male human being)
    Det sitter tre menn og to kvinner i styret.There are three men and two women on the board.
  2. (mostly in regular sayings and idioms) A human being, person
    Den vanlige mannThe man in the street, the ordinary citizen
    Gå ned med mann og musBe lost with all hands
    (literally: "Go down with man and mouse")
  3. A person with certain praiseworthy qualities, often used about males
    Være mann nok forBe a man enough for
    Være en mannBe a man
  4. One's husband (see also ektemann)
    Hun mistet mannen sin i en ulykke for tre år siden.She lost her husband in an accident three years ago.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mann, accusative case of maðr (man) (compare the accusative of the Icelandic maður). Originally the word only had the sense "human" but later changed to primarily designate an adult male, the original meaning being replaced by words such as menneske and person. Believed to ultimately be from Proto-Germanic *mann-, stemming from the Proto-Indo-European *man- (a root). Cognate with Swedish man, Danish mand, Faroese and Icelandic maður, English man and many others.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mann m (definite singular mannen, indefinite plural menn, definite plural mennene)

  1. man (adult male human being)
  2. (mostly in regular sayings and idioms) human being, person
  3. person with certain praiseworthy qualities, often used about males
  4. husband (see also ektemann)

SynonymsEdit

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Cognate with Old Frisian mon, Old Saxon mann, Old Dutch man, Old High German man, Old Norse maðr, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mann m (nominative plural menn)

  1. person
    Man biþ mann þurh ōðre menn.
    One is a person through other people.
    menn wǣron on wambum ġesmiðode ealdra steorrena.
    We humans were forged in the bellies of ancient stars.
  2. man meaning mankind
    Mann biþ menn wulf.
    Man is a wolf to man.
    Mann is ealra þinga mǣþ.
    Man is the measure of all things.
  3. (rare or non-literary) man meaning adult male
  4. the rune , representing the sound /m/

Usage notesEdit

  • When mann occurred as the last part of a personal name, it was inflected as an a-stem: thus the dative singular of "Ġearumann" (name of a bishop) was "Ġearumanne", not *Ġearumenn. In other compounds it was inflected the same way as when it occurred by itself, i.e. as a consonant stem: þām wīfmenn ("the woman" [dative singular]), not *þām wīfmanne.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: mon, man, manne, monne, mæn
    • Scots: man
    • English: man
      • Tok Pisin: man
      • Chinese: man
      • Chinook Jargon: man
      • Korean: (maen)
      • Spanish: man
      • Thai: แมน (mɛɛn)
      • Volapük: man
    • English: -man
    • Yola: man

Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

mann m

  1. accusative singular indefinite of maðr