See also: männ, Mann, and Mànn

Cimbrian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German man, from Old High German man, from Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Cognate with German Mann, Dutch man, English man, Icelandic maður, Swedish man, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

Noun edit

mann m (plural mannediminutive ménle) (Sette Comuni)

  1. man
  2. husband

Declension edit

References edit

  • Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Luserna / Lusérn: Le nostre parole / Ünsarne börtar / Unsere Wörter [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien
  • “mann” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Cornish edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

mann

  1. at all

Noun edit

mann m

  1. nothing, nil

Numeral edit

mann

  1. zero

Faroese edit

Noun edit

mann

  1. accusative singular of maður

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

mann

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽

Icelandic edit

Noun edit

mann m

  1. indefinite accusative singular of maður

Luxembourgish edit

Etymology edit

Backformation from the comparative manner, from Middle High German minder, from Old High German minniro (less; fewer), from Proto-West Germanic *minniʀō, from Proto-Germanic *minnizô, and/or reinterpretation (as a positive) of Old High German min (less), from Proto-Germanic *minniz, adverbial form of the former.

Compare the same in Dutch min. The Luxembourgish vocalism is regular through -i--a- in closed syllables.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

mann (masculine mann, neuter mann, comparative manner, superlative am mannsten)

  1. little, few

Usage notes edit

  • The positive and comparative forms are indeclinable and cannot be preceded by articles or determiners. The superlative is declined in the normal way.

Declension edit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Norn edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse maðr.

Noun edit

mann m

  1. man
  2. married man
  3. master of the house

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Danish mand (pre-1907 Riksmål spelling), from Old Norse mann, accusative case of maðr (man) (compare the accusative of Icelandic maður). Originally the word only had the sense "human" but later changed to primarily designate an adult male, the original meaning being replaced by words such as menneske and person. Believed to ultimately be from Proto-Germanic *mann-, stemming from the Proto-Indo-European *man- (a root). Cognate with Swedish man, Danish mand, Faroese and Icelandic maður, English man and many others.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mann m (definite singular mannen, indefinite plural menn, definite plural mennene)

  1. a man (adult male human being)
    Det sitter tre menn og to kvinner i styret.There are three men and two women on the board.
  2. (mostly in regular sayings and idioms) A human being, person
    Den vanlige mannThe man in the street, the ordinary citizen
    Gå ned med mann og musBe lost with all hands (literally, “Go down with man and mouse”)
  3. A person with certain praiseworthy qualities, often used about males
    Være mann nok forBe a man enough for
    Være en mannBe a man
  4. One's husband (see also ektemann)
    Hun mistet mannen sin i en ulykke for tre år siden.She lost her husband in an accident three years ago.

Alternative forms edit

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse mann, accusative case of maðr (man) (compare the accusative of the Icelandic maður). Originally the word only had the sense "human" but later changed to primarily designate an adult male, the original meaning being replaced by words such as menneske and person. Believed to ultimately be from Proto-Germanic *mann-, stemming from the Proto-Indo-European *man- (a root). Cognate with Swedish man, Danish mand, Faroese and Icelandic maður, English man and many others.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /manː/, (palatalisation) /maɲː/
  • Rhymes: -anː

Noun edit

mann m (definite singular mannen, indefinite plural menn, definite plural mennene)

  1. man (adult male human being)
  2. (mostly in regular sayings and idioms) human being, person
  3. person with certain praiseworthy qualities, often used about males
  4. husband (see also ektemann)

Inflection edit

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

Old English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-. Cognate with Old Frisian mon, Old Saxon mann, Old Dutch man, Old High German man, Old Norse maðr, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mann m (nominative plural menn)

  1. person
    Man biþ mann þurh ōðre menn.
    One is a person through other people.
    menn wǣron on wambum ġesmiðode ealdra steorrena.
    We humans were forged in the bellies of ancient stars.
    • c. 995, Ælfric, Extracts on Grammar in English
      Ǣġðer is mann ġe wer ġe wīf.
      A person is either male or female.
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "Midlent Sunday"
      God ġesċōp æt fruman twēġen menn, wer and wīf.
      In the beginning, God created two human beings, a man and a woman.
    • 11th century, anonymous fragment of a Life of Saint Mildred
      Wæs hēo swīðe ġemyndgu þæt wē eall of twām mannum cōmon.
      She always remembered that we all came from two people.
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of The Consolation of Philosophy
      Þā cwæþ hē, "Wāst þū hwæt mann sīe?" Þā cwæþ iċ, "Iċ wāt þæt hit biþ sāwol and līchama."
      Then he said, "Do you know what a person is?" So I said, "I know it's a soul and a body."
    • "The Wife's Lament"
      Ongunnon þæt þæs mannes māgas hyċġan þurh dierne ġeþōht þæt hīe tōdǣlden unc.
      The person's relatives began to think of a secret plan to separate us.
    • c. 990, Wessex Gospels, Matthew 24:38-39
      On þǣm dagum ǣr þǣm flōde wǣron menn etende and drincende, and wīfiġende and ġifte sellende, ōþ þone dæġ þe Nōe on þā earċe ēode, and hīe nysson ǣr sē flōd cōm and nam hīe ealle.
      In the days before the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and they didn't know until the flood came and took them all.
  2. man meaning mankind
    Mann biþ menn wulf.
    Man is a wolf to man.
    Þing sind on weorolde þe sē mann nǣfre witan ne sċolde.
    There are things in the world man was never meant to know.
  3. (rare or non-literary) man meaning adult male
  4. the rune , representing the sound /m/

Usage notes edit

  • Unlike in Modern English, this word rarely refers specifically to males. For such cases, wer is far more common.

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle English: mon, man, manne, mæn, monne
    • English: man, -man (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: man
    • Yola: man

See also edit

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Late Latin manna, from Ancient Greek μάννα (mánna), from Biblical Hebrewמָן(mān, manna).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mann f (genitive mainne, no plural)

  1. manna (food)
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 97d10
      Is peccad díabul lesom .i. fodord doïb di dommatu, ⁊ du·fúairthed ní leu fora sáith din main, ⁊ todlugud inna féulæ ɔ amairis nánda·tibérad Día doïb, ⁊ nach coimnacuir ⁊ issi dano insin ind frescissiu co fochaid.
      It is a double sin in his opinion, i.e. the murmuring by them of want, although there remained some of the manna with them upon their satiety, and demanding the meat with faithlessness that God would not give it to them, and [even] that he could not; therefore that is the expectation with testing.

Declension edit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mannL
Vocative mannL
Accusative mainnN
Genitive mainneH
Dative mainnL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mann
also mmann after a proclitic
mann
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Old Norse edit

Noun edit

mann m

  1. accusative singular indefinite of maðr

Old Saxon edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *mann, from Proto-Germanic *mann-.

Noun edit

mann m

  1. human, person
  2. man

Synonyms edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle Low German: man
    • German Low German: Mann