See also: Gali, gālí, galį, and гали

GamilaraayEdit

 
gali

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Central New South Wales *galing.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gali

  1. water
  2. rain
  3. tear

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Austin, Peter. 1993. A Reference Dictionary of Gamilaraay, northern New South Wales.
  • (2003) Gamilaraay Yuwaalaraay Yuwaalayaay Dictionary

IbanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gali

  1. to lie down

IndonesianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡali/
  • Rhymes: -li, -i
  • Hyphenation: ɡa‧li

Etymology 1Edit

From Malay gali, from kali, from Proto-Malayic *kali, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kali, from Proto-Austronesian *kalih.

VerbEdit

gali

  1. to dig (to move hard-packed earth out of the way)
ConjugationEdit
Conjugation of gali (meng-, transitive)
Root gali
Active Involuntary Passive Imperative Jussive
Active menggali tergali digali gali galilahlah
Locative
Causative / Applicative1 menggalikan tergalikan digalikan galikan galikanlah
Causative
Locative
Causative / Applicative1
1The -kan row is either causative or applicative, with transitive roots it mostly has applicative meaning.
Notes:
Some of these forms do normally not exist or are rarely used in standard Indonesian. Some forms may also change meaning.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch galei, from Middle Dutch galeye, from Old French galee, from Latin galea, from Byzantine Greek γαλέα (galéa) of unknown origin, probably from Ancient Greek γαλέη (galéē), a kind of a small fish, from γαλεός (galeós, dog-fish or small shark). Cognate of Malay gali, ghali (galley).

NounEdit

gali (first-person possessive galiku, second-person possessive galimu, third-person possessive galinya)

  1. (nautical) galley: A long, slender ship propelled primarily by oars, whether having masts and sails or not; usually referring to rowed warships used in the Mediterranean from the 16th century until the modern era.

Etymology 3Edit

Blend of gabungan (group) +‎ anak (child) +‎ liar (wild).

NounEdit

gali (first-person possessive galiku, second-person possessive galimu, third-person possessive galinya)

  1. criminal
    Hyponyms: pencoleng, penodong, perampok

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

galî m

  1. plural of galio

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

gali m

  1. nominative plural form of gals
  2. vocative plural form of gals

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (galì) IPA(key): [ɡɐˈlʲɪ]
  • (gãli) IPA(key): [ˈɡaːlʲɪ], [ɡalʲ]

VerbEdit

galì

  1. second-person singular present of galėti

VerbEdit

gãli

  1. third-person singular present of galėti
  2. third-person plural present of galėti

MalayEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From kali, from Proto-Malayic *kali (compare Indonesian gali), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kali (compare Fijian keri, Ilocano kali, Maori keri, Sundanese ᮍᮜᮤ (ngali), Tongan keli), from Proto-Austronesian *kalih.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡali/
  • Rhymes: -ali, -li, -i
  • (file)

VerbEdit

gali (used in the form menggali)

  1. to dig (to move hard-packed earth out of the way)

SynonymsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gali

  1. (non-standard since 2012) feminine singular of galen
  2. (non-standard since 2012) neuter singular of galen

VerbEdit

gali

  1. (non-standard since 2012) past participle of gala and gale

Old NorseEdit

VerbEdit

gali

  1. third-person singular/plural present active subjunctive of gala

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡa.li/
  • Rhymes: -ali
  • Syllabification: ga‧li

NounEdit

gali f

  1. inflection of gala:
    1. genitive/dative/locative singular
    2. genitive plural

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gali m

  1. indefinite plural of gal

SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gali (invariable)

  1. Alternative form of ghali

TokelauanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈŋa.li/
  • Hyphenation: ga‧li

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Polynesian *ŋali. Cognates include Hawaiian nani and Maori ngari.

VerbEdit

gali (plural gagali)

  1. (stative) to be pretty, beautiful

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Polynesian *ŋali. Cognates include Hawaiian nali and Samoan gali.

VerbEdit

gali (plural tagali)

  1. (intransitive) to gnaw
  2. (transitive) to eat by gnawing

ReferencesEdit

  • R. Simona, editor (1986) Tokelau Dictionary[1], Auckland: Office of Tokelau Affairs, page 136

VietnameseEdit

Chemical element
Ga
Previous: kẽm (Zn)
Next: gemani (Ge)

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from New Latin gallium, with the suffix -um removed as with most chemical elements.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gali

  1. gallium