See also: gungë

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See gong.

NounEdit

gunge (plural gunges)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of gong: an outhouse.

Etymology 2Edit

First attested around 1935-40. Probably an alteration of gunk.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡʌnd͡ʒ/
    • (file)

NounEdit

gunge (usually uncountable, plural gunges)

  1. (Britain) A viscous or sticky substance, particularly an unpleasant one of vague or unknown composition; goo; gunk.
    • 1978, A. S. Byatt, The Virgin in The Garden, Vintage International 1992, p.390:
      Have I got trails of gunge on these frills?
  2. (organic chemistry, informal) Tholin.
    • 11 January 1979, Dr Bernard Dixon (editor), "Grains between the stars account for spectra", in New Scientist:
      They call this solid material tholin (after the Greek word for muddy), but it seems likely that chemists will continue to call this rather familiar material “'gunge.”
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

gunge (third-person singular simple present gunges, present participle gunging, simple past and past participle gunged)

  1. (often with "up") To clog with gunge.
  2. (Britain) To cover with gunge.
    • 2012, Simon Packham, The Bex Factor:
      I've been gunged on children's TV, hung out with some actors off that soap Dad used to watch, done a photoshoot for a major highstreet fashion outlet and now here we are on the red carpet, outside the cinema in Leicester Square []
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

NounEdit

gunge

  1. indefinite genitive/dative/ablative singular of gungë

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gunge

  1. Alternative form of yong

ReferencesEdit


North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian gunga or gān, which derives from Proto-Germanic *ganganą (to go, walk, step).

VerbEdit

gunge

  1. (Mooring) to go

ConjugationEdit



Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian gunga, ganga, from Proto-Germanic *ganganą. More at English gang.

VerbEdit

gunge

  1. to go