Translingual edit

Symbol edit

san

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Sanskrit.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
san

From Ancient Greek σάν (sán), from Semitic.

Noun edit

san (plural sans)

  1. A letter of the Archaic Greek alphabet (uppercase Ϻ, lowercase ϻ) that came after pi and before qoppa.
Translations edit

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Shortening of sanatorium.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æn

Noun edit

san (plural sans)

  1. (dated, informal) A sanatorium.
    • 1940, Enid Blyton, The Naughtiest Girl in the School:
      "Haven't you heard?" said Belinda. "Joan's ill! She'd got a high temperature, and she's in bed in the San."
    • 1958, Doris Lessing, A Ripple From the Storm, HarperPerennial, published 1995, page 122:
      ‘I was in the san for ten months before the war. I know all the gen about being sick.’
    • 2005, Dan Soucoup, Richard Thorne McCully, McCully's New Brunswick, page 137:
      River Glade Sanatorium, River Glade, June 25, 1931. The "San" at River Glade with the Petitcodiac River in the background.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afar edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Cushitic *ʔisŋʷ-. Cognates include Hadiyya sane, Oromo funyaan, Sidamo sano, Somali san and Saho san.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsan/, [ˈsʌn]
  • Hyphenation: san

Noun edit

sán m (plural sanitté f or sanwá f)

  1. nose

References edit

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 61

Atong (India) edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

san

  1. day

References edit

Catalan edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

san f (plural sans)

  1. San; the Archaic Greek letter Ϻ (lowercase ϻ)

Classical Nahuatl edit

Particle edit

san

  1. Alternative spelling of zan

Cypriot Arabic edit

Etymology edit

From the diminutive of Arabicلِسَان(lisān).

Noun edit

san f (plural sanát)

  1. tongue
  2. language

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Borg, Alexander (2004) A Comparative Glossary of Cypriot Maronite Arabic (Arabic–English) (Handbook of Oriental Studies; I.70), Leiden and Boston: Brill, page 417

Dongxiang edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Mongolic *sam, compare Mongolian сам (sam).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

san

  1. comb

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

From Ancient Greek σάν (sán).

Noun edit

san c (plural san's, diminutive sannetje n)

  1. san (archaic Greek letter)

Further reading edit

French edit

Pronunciation 1 edit

Noun edit

san m (plural san)

  1. san (Greek letter)

Pronunciation 2 edit

Etymology edit

Blend of son +‎ sa.

Determiner edit

san n (singular, plural ses)

  1. (gender-neutral, neologism) his, her, their, its
    Je connais très bien san partenaire.
    I know their partner wery well.
Related terms edit
Possessee
Singular Plural
Masculine Feminine
Possessor Singular First person mon1 ma mes
Second person ton1 ta tes
Third person son1 sa ses
Plural First person notre nos
Second person votre2 vos2
Third person leur leurs
1 Also used before feminine adjectives and nouns beginning with a vowel or mute h.
2 Also used as the polite singular form.
See also edit

Anagrams edit

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin sānus.

Adjective edit

san

  1. healthy, sound

Related terms edit

Galician edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese san, from Latin sanctus. Cognate with Portuguese são and Spanish san.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

san m (apocopate, standard form santo)

  1. (before nouns which began by a consonant) Apocopic form of santo (saint)

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese são (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin sānus. Cognate with Portuguese são and Spanish sano.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

san (feminine sa, masculine plural sans, feminine plural sas)

  1. healthy, sound
    • 1775, María Francisca Isla y Losada, Romance:
      Ay Jesús! miña Joiña!
      non falemos nesto mais,
      que dá grima sò o pensalo,
      Deus vos garde bo é san.
      Santiago. Febreiro doce
      Aÿ! que non sey que me dà,
      que me esfraquezo de todo,
      è non podo vafexàr.
      Oh, Jesus! My Jewel!
      Let's not talk about this anymore
      because it brings creeps just to think about it.
      God take care of you, safe and sound.
      Santiago, February twelve
      Oh!, I don't know what happens to me
      I'm totally weakening
      and I can't breathe
Related terms edit

References edit

  • são” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • san” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • são” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • san” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • san” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • san” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Garifuna edit

Etymology edit

Probably from French cent.

Numeral edit

san

  1. hundred

Haitian Creole edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From French cent (hundred).

Numeral edit

san

  1. hundred

Etymology 2 edit

From French sang (blood).

Noun edit

san

  1. blood

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Irish (i)sind, (i)sin, from Old Irish isin(d/t) (in the m or f or n sg dative), isin (into the m or f sg accusative), isa (into the n sg accusative), from Proto-Celtic *in sindū/sindai (in the m sg/f sg dative), *in sindom/sindam (into the m sg/f sg accusative).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sˠən̪ˠ/, /sˠənˠ/ (before a, o, u, fha, fho, fhu)
  • IPA(key): /sˠənʲ/ (before e, i, fhe, fhi)

Contraction edit

san

  1. preposition i + definite article an: in the (singular)
Usage notes edit

Used before vowel sounds and f (which lenites); (otherwise, sa is used):

  • san amhránin the song
  • san fhocalin the word

Often understood to be a contraction of ins an, but the forms san, sa were in common use by the 12th century and accepted in Classical Gaelic poetry while ins is a later innovation with the -n- reintroduced by analogy.

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Osborn Bergin (1916), “Irish Grammatical Tracts (Introductory)”, in Ériu, volume 8, Supplement, Royal Irish Academy, →DOI, →JSTOR, §67, page 17
  • McKenna, Lambert, editor (1944) Bardic Syntactical Tracts, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, page 113: “Before pl. art. i n- gives is na, ’sna; in such cases a h- gives as na. (…) Before sg. art. i n- is isin, san (often sa before consonants).”
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “i”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Ó Dónaill, Niall (1977), “san”, in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, Dublin: An Gúm, →ISBN
  • Entries containing “san” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sˠən̪ˠ/, /sˠənˠ/

Determiner edit

san

  1. (nonstandard) Alternative form of sin (that) (used after a broad consonant)
    an fear santhat man (standard: an fear sin)

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsan/
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Hyphenation: sàn

Etymology 1 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

san m or f (uncountable)

  1. san (Greek letter)

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

san m (apocopated)

  1. (used before a consonant) Apocopic form of santo saint
    San PietroSaint Peter

See also edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

san

  1. Rōmaji transcription of さん
  2. Rōmaji transcription of サン

Karaim edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Turkic *sā-. Compare to Turkish san, Southern Altai сагыш (sagïš), etc.

Noun edit

san

  1. number

References edit

  • N. A. Baskakov, S.M. Šapšala, editor (1973), “san”, in Karaimsko-Russko-Polʹskij Slovarʹ, Moskva, →ISBN

Khasi edit

Khasi cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : san

Etymology edit

From Proto-Khasian *san. Compare Pnar san, Lyngngam san, War-Jaintia san.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

san

  1. five

Verb edit

san

  1. to grow up

References edit

  • Singh, U Nissor (1906) Khasi-English dictionary[2], Shillong: Eastern Bengal and Assam Secretariat Press, page 183. Searchable online at SEAlang.net.

Kuna edit

Noun edit

san

  1. meat

Lombard edit

Etymology edit

Akin to Italian sano, from Latin sanus.

Adjective edit

san

  1. healthy

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

san (san5san0, Zhuyin ˙ㄙㄢ)

  1. Hanyu Pinyin reading of 𠮿

san

  1. Nonstandard spelling of sān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of sǎn.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of sàn.

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

A contracted form of earlier sægen, from Old English sæċġan, alternative form of seċġan.

Verb edit

sãn

  1. Alternative form of seien

Etymology 2 edit

From Old French san, alternative form of senz.

Preposition edit

san

  1. Alternative form of saunz

Min Nan edit

For pronunciation and definitions of san – see (“mountain; hill; hill-shaped object; etc.”).
(This term is the pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin sum, from Classical Latin suum.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Determiner edit

san m

  1. (Jersey) his, her, its (used to qualify masculine nouns)

North Frisian edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Frisian sunne. Cognates include West Frisian sinne.

Noun edit

san m

  1. (Mooring and Föhr-Amrum) sun
    A san gungt up.The sun rises.
    A san gungt oner.The sun sets.

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Frisian sīn.

Pronoun edit

san m (feminine sin, neuter sin, plural sin)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) his

Old Czech edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sanь.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

san f or m animal

  1. dragon
    Synonym: drak

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Czech: saň

Further reading edit

Old French edit

Noun edit

san oblique singularm (oblique plural sans, nominative singular sans, nominative plural san)

  1. Alternative form of sens

Pali edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Sanskrit श्वन् (śvan).

Noun edit

san m

  1. dog

Declension edit

Only consensus forms are shown.

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Pali Text Society (1921–1925), “san”, in Pali-English Dictionary‎, London: Chipstead

Pnar edit

Pnar cardinal numbers
 <  4 5 6  > 
    Cardinal : san
    Ordinal : wa san

Etymology edit

From Proto-Khasian *san, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *suun ~ *suən ~ *sən; cognate with Khasi san, Mang han², Mon မသုန် (pəsɔn) and Proto-Palaungic *pəsan (whence Riang [Lang] kʰan¹ and Danau θʊn⁴).

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

san

  1. (cardinal number) five

Rohingya edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Sanskrit चन्द्र (candra); cognate with Bengali চাঁদ (cãd).

Noun edit

san (Hanifi spelling𐴏𐴝𐴕⁩)

  1. moon

Romani edit

Verb edit

san

  1. second-person singular present indicative of si

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish (i)sind, (i)sin, from Old Irish isin(d/t) (in the m or f or n sg dative), isin (into the m or f sg accusative), isa (into the n sg accusative).

Preposition edit

san

  1. in the
    san anmochin the evening
    san fhad-ùinein the long run
    san t-seanchasin conversation
    san achadh bhuanin the harvest field

Usage notes edit

  • This form is not used before nouns beginning with b, c, g, m or p, where sa is used instead.
  • If followed by f, the f is lenited:
    facal - word,
    san fhacal - in the word.
  • Often understood to be a contraction of anns an, but the forms san, sa were in common use by the 12th century and accepted in Classical Gaelic poetry while anns is a later innovation with the -n- reintroduced by analogy.

Related terms edit

References edit

  • Osborn Bergin (1916), “Irish Grammatical Tracts (Introductory)”, in Ériu, volume 8, Supplement, Royal Irish Academy, →DOI, →JSTOR, §67, page 17
  • McKenna, Lambert, editor (1944) Bardic Syntactical Tracts, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, page 113: “Before pl. art. i n- gives is na, ’sna; in such cases a h- gives as na. (…) Before sg. art. i n- is isin, san (often sa before consonants).”
  • G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “i”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *sъ̀nъ, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *súpnas, from Proto-Indo-European *supnós.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sȁn m (Cyrillic spelling са̏н)

  1. sleep
  2. dream
    Šta si videla u tom snu?What did you see in that dream?

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • san” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Somali edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Cushitic *ʔisŋʷ-. Cognates include Afar san, Hadiyya sane, Oromo funyaan, Saho san and Sidamo sano.

Noun edit

san ?

  1. nose

References edit

  • san Afmaal Somali-English Dictionary.

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsan/ [ˈsãn]
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: san

Etymology 1 edit

Alternative forms edit

  • San (in proper nouns, capitalized)

Noun edit

san m (plural sanes)

  1. (Dominican Republic) financial, temporal-savings scheme; the participants periodically contribute a quota to a communal pot that is given to one member, based on his/her turn amongst all the others

Adjective edit

san m (apocopate, standard form santo)

  1. (before the noun) Apocopic form of santo (saint)
Usage notes edit
  • Not used in front of the following names (use santo instead): Tomás, Tomé, Toribio, and Domingo.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

san f (plural sanes)

  1. san; the Greek letter M, ϻ

Further reading edit

Tagalog edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

san (Baybayin spelling ᜐᜈ᜔)

  1. Informal form of saan.

Tatar edit

Noun edit

san

  1. number
  2. shin, hind leg
  3. limb

Ter Sami edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Russian са́ни (sáni).

Noun edit

san

  1. sledge, sleigh

Further reading edit

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002–2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[4], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Tok Pisin edit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.
 
Tok Pisin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia tpi

Etymology edit

From English sun.

Noun edit

san

  1. sun
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 1:15:
      God i mekim kamap tupela bikpela lait. Bikpela em san bilong givim lait long de, na liklik em mun bilong givim lait long nait. Na God i mekim kamap ol sta tu.
      →New International Version translation

Derived terms edit

Torres Strait Creole edit

Etymology edit

From English sun.

Noun edit

san

  1. sun

Turkish edit

Etymology edit

From Ottoman Turkishصان(san), a derivation from Proto-Turkic *sā- (to count). Related to say- (to count) and san- (to consider).

Noun edit

san (definite accusative sanı, plural sanlar)

  1. name
  2. reputation

Declension edit

Inflection
Nominative san
Definite accusative sanı
Singular Plural
Nominative san sanlar
Definite accusative sanı sanları
Dative sana sanlara
Locative sanda sanlarda
Ablative sandan sanlardan
Genitive sanın sanların
Possessive forms
Nominative
Singular Plural
1st singular sanım sanlarım
2nd singular sanın sanların
3rd singular sanı sanları
1st plural sanımız sanlarımız
2nd plural sanınız sanlarınız
3rd plural sanları sanları
Definite accusative
Singular Plural
1st singular sanımı sanlarımı
2nd singular sanını sanlarını
3rd singular sanını sanlarını
1st plural sanımızı sanlarımızı
2nd plural sanınızı sanlarınızı
3rd plural sanlarını sanlarını
Dative
Singular Plural
1st singular sanıma sanlarıma
2nd singular sanına sanlarına
3rd singular sanına sanlarına
1st plural sanımıza sanlarımıza
2nd plural sanınıza sanlarınıza
3rd plural sanlarına sanlarına
Locative
Singular Plural
1st singular sanımda sanlarımda
2nd singular sanında sanlarında
3rd singular sanında sanlarında
1st plural sanımızda sanlarımızda
2nd plural sanınızda sanlarınızda
3rd plural sanlarında sanlarında
Ablative
Singular Plural
1st singular sanımdan sanlarımdan
2nd singular sanından sanlarından
3rd singular sanından sanlarından
1st plural sanımızdan sanlarımızdan
2nd plural sanınızdan sanlarınızdan
3rd plural sanlarından sanlarından
Genitive
Singular Plural
1st singular sanımın sanlarımın
2nd singular sanının sanlarının
3rd singular sanının sanlarının
1st plural sanımızın sanlarımızın
2nd plural sanınızın sanlarınızın
3rd plural sanlarının sanlarının
Predicative forms
Singular Plural
1st singular sanım sanlarım
2nd singular sansın sanlarsın
3rd singular san
sandır
sanlar
sanlardır
1st plural sanız sanlarız
2nd plural sansınız sanlarsınız
3rd plural sanlar sanlardır

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • san”, in Turkish dictionaries, Türk Dil Kurumu

Venetian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin sanus.

Adjective edit

san

  1. healthy

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

san

  1. to flatten
  2. to make equal

Derived terms edit

Derived terms

Yoruba edit

Etymology 1 edit

Cognate with Igala ra

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

san

  1. to pay
    Ó ti san owó orí ìyàwó.He has paid the bride price.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

sàn

  1. to be good; to be well
    Synonyms: dára, yááyì
    Ó sàn kí a sinmi.It's good that we rest.
  2. to heal
    Ọgbẹ́ ti sàn.The wound has healed.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

sán

  1. (with àrá (thunder)) to thunder
    Àrá ń sán.Thunder is striking.

Etymology 4 edit

Compare Nupe sán (to split; to ache (head)).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

sán

  1. to crack; to split
    Òkúta ti sán.The rock has split.
  2. (with orí (head)) to ache
    Synonym: fọ́
    Orí ń sán mi.My head is aching me.

Zhuang edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Tai *saːn. Cognate with Thai สาน (sǎan), Northern Thai ᩈᩣ᩠ᨶ, Lao ສານ (sān), ᦉᦱᧃ (ṡaan), Khün ᩈᩣ᩠ᨶ, Shan သၢၼ် (sǎan), Ahom 𑜏𑜃𑜫 (san).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

san (1957–1982 spelling san)

  1. to weave